Book Review of “25 Atonements” from John Chinaka Onyeche (reviewed by Aondonengen Jacob Kwaghkule)

GRIEF IN CONTEMPORARY POETRY: AN AFTERMATH OF MALADMINISTRATION OF MOST 21ST CENTURY SOCIETIES; A GLANCE AT JOHN CHINAKA ONYECHE’S 25 ATONEMENTS.

BY: Kwaghkule Aondonengen Jacob.

25 Atonements is a forty paged poetry book penned by John Chinaka Onyeche. It is embedded with a lot of literal and figurative accurately engineered aesthetics. All the poems in the said collection are stylistically titled and numbered in Atonements from one to the twenty-fifth Atonement. Of a truth, all these poems are wow-stricken as well as mind-blowing considering the tone and the era in which they have been rendered.

Grief, according to English Dictionary means suffering, hardship. Grief is also defined as pain of mind arising from misfortune, significant personal loss, bereavement, misconduct of oneself or others, etc.; sorrow; sadness. Grief is the cause or instance of sorrow or pain; that which afflicts or distresses; trial.

In the poetry book, 25 Atonements, John China Onyeche has deliberately portrayed grief like sellers do display their wares in market squares_the picture of a girl captured in the early pages of the book speaks volumes_although, not minding the different view of the poet as seen in “Atonement Seven”. It is undoubtedly verifiable, that most 21st Century Societies, Nigeria inclusive, have failed their citizens just like the world always disappoints new born babies resulting into their cries immediately after being born.

Nigeria is one of the underdeveloped 21st Century societies_so to say. The level of maladministration in this country makes her to be termed an underdeveloped [if not undeveloped] nation till date. The question is how can a poet living in such a ruined society think straight other than being constantly interrupted by grief? With this, John Chinaka Onyeche has vindicated and bears no blames for having penning down grief in ‘poetrical’ lines.

Beginning from the interlude anchored by Tares Oburumu to the last Atonement, it can be inferred that this society has caused this grief  made visible in many poems of these poets today. For Tares openly says:  “I know of a happiness that doesn’t include me in its typical home. So I create one and rub it on my body. Does it smell? Am I the scent only my mirror understands?” No wonder, till date, Nigerians still seek homes on the shores of other societies…

One of the key amenities of life is shelter. This when it’s lacked, peace is lost and grief is activated. John Chinaka Onyeche has been /longing for a home in a home/ all this while. He captures this disillusionment in his second Atonement thus;

“When I stare into the face of yesterday
Home whispers hope to live on
But how else should I live
Atoning for yester-longings?” (Pg.14).

The question of homelessness in this society has promoted Onyeche to asking that /Where can be more home, than where the heart already lives, without leaving?/ In this poem, the author has succinctly explained what grief is, that:

“Grief, you’re a kin, bestriding the threshold
I know you, I know your story
—of a river holding a large whale
I know your story of a winter breeze
Scrubbing away light
You are a cloudy sky without rain
You are a shell without snail” (Pg.16).

The futility of many a citizen’s efforts in this Society is unfathomable. In different sectors, the Government of the people has kept denying being for the people. It contradicts what the poet has believed in. In his belief, it is biblically asserted that /“Ask and it shall be given,/Knock and the door shall be opened/For whosoever inquires shall find”/

Yet, here, a poet prays:

God save a poet atoning for the clouds
Gathering them from a blue sky with sun (Pg.21).

In a society filled with dysfunctional mayhems, a poet is left with nothing but his pen putting down pains to paper. It is evident as Onyeche puts; /My grief is clothed in the garb of rhetoric/(Pg.26). As /Words have galloped on our tongues/Pulling even the last pinch of steel/(Pg.32) and all that is made of this society is likened to;

A broken bucket
A broken water pot
A city of broken walls
A broken metaphor (Pg.31).

Indeed,  /This society has become a fire that burns me/[emphasis mine] and /I breathe here like a saltwater tide, coming in in the mornings and returning in the evenings/(Pg.34). Sadly, we only live to groan about /the wishes which dressed my good old days/(Pg.36).  For;

The stories told from a broken wall

Have held us bound a thousand times

If we don’t return to retell our tales of old

The days shall go by and not let us go on

Conclusively, it is what the society tells a poet to write he writes. John Chinaka Onyeche has done so. Poetry has therefore, been used here as a tool for exposng the cause of many a poet’s grief amidst this contemporary turmoil; the failure of the Government at all levels.

https://tinyurl.com/562pkrc4

Bio:

John Chinaka Onyeche “Rememberajc” (he/his) is an author of three poetry collections “Echoes Across The Atlantic”, a husband, father and poet from Nigeria. He writes from the city of Port Harcourt Rivers State, Nigeria. He is currently a student of History and Diplomatic Studies at Ignatius Ajuru University Of Education Port Harcourt Rivers State.

John Chinaka can be reached through the following means:

Rememberajc.wordpress.com

Facebook.com/jehovahisgood 

Twitter.com/apostlejohnchin

Apostlejohnchinaka@gmail.com

https://linktr.ee/Rememberajc

Poetry Showcase June 2022 for John Chinaka Onyeche “Rememberajc”

New poem “Journey of Love” by John Chinaka Onyeche

Poetry Focus on John Chinaka Onyeche (Rememberajc) 8 poems

Bio for Reviewer:

Kwaghkule, Aondonengen Jacob is popularly known by his pen name “Mr Kvip”. He’s an awarded Nigerian poet with multiple online and traditional publications.  A two time finalist for Pengician Chapbook Poetry Prize, 2021 and 2022, an Entrant for NSPP, 2021, and a Longlist, African Human Right Playwriting Prize, 2021. Kwaghkule Aondonengen Jacob bagged a B.A Honours in English and Literary Studies from the prestigious Federal University, Wukari, Nigeria, where he serves as the Poetry Editor for Insights. If he’s not writing, he’s admiring the beauty around him.

2 poems from Bojana Stojcic

Until I Come Up With the Right Words That Will Have All The Necessary Things They Require, but Nothing Extra

I’ll keep trying to find the ones to describe
what’s with the silence, and I’m sure there’s

a perfectly simple explanation why I lost them
so I reckon I’ll sit down, write an essay on

steps to finding your voice again
something easy to follow, however deep and

evocative, which will, in a way that is clear
and not difficult to understand, of course,

demonstrate that the key is to
not be afraid, grasp that handle and pull it

kind of shit, though there’s no use being
all ears when you don’t know a language,
 
is there, meaning I’ll probably resort to
a dictionary for everything that sounds

important, serious too, then forget what I’ve
read, just let my blood drip onto crumpled paper

unrestrained like waves that

beat
beat 
beat

the shore

or ask you—

doesn’t it scare you
when you use plain words like that


Out on the road is like on paper

Every time I think of leaving
I think of Jack pushing that old car
and all those
rivers, peaks and shores he never found
(like all the ones he ever did)

we’re born under the same stars
wash in the same puddles
die in the same dugouts

we find what works best for us by accident



BIO: Bojana Stojcic loves authentic voices, unfettered by norms and academic expectations. When writing herself, she enjoys experimenting with structure and style, which makes the road bumpier, though the journey more exciting and rewarding. You can read her in Eunoia Review, The Opiate, Burning House Press, Spelk and elsewhere.

Poetry inspired by Joni Mitchell from Diane Elayne Dees

For Joni

The canyons echo the coyote's mournful cry
of loneliness, for which there are no words,
yet suddenly, like graceful home-bound birds,
the words appear as written on the sky.
The painted ponies dip, then leap so high,
they startle us. In silver-bridled herds,
they bear us through the grand and the absurd;
at journey's end, we still do not know why.
And yet the music calls us to go on,
amid an often misty atmosphere
that tends to blur the darkness and the light.                                     
The melodies remain after we've gone,
as glorious reminders we were here,
though we are stardust scattered in the night.

Originally published in the anthology, Poeming Pigeon: Poems About Music 

BIO:

Diane Elayne Dees is the author of the poetry chapbooks, Coronary Truth (Kelsay Books) The Last Time I Saw You (Finishing Line Press), and The Wild Parrots of Marigny (Querencia Press). Diane, who lives in Covington, Louisiana, also publishes Women Who Serve, a blog that delivers news and commentary on women’s professional tennis throughout the world. Her author blog is Diane Elayne Dees: Poet and Writer-at-Large.

Women Who Serve

DIANE ELAYNE DEES: POET AND WRITER-AT-LARGE

Poetry from Doryn Herbst “Huskies”

Huskies

Double fur to pull them through
a snow desert. That snow in their eyes,
pools of moonstone and gold
arrowed against the cold.

Muscled team-players, a playful team,
best of friends, your best friend.
Six Siberians howling.

These loyal workers know how to pull.
They gather speed over drifts packing
down close, their weight harnessed
to glide in unison over ice-cold air, slide
over frigid rivers, leap past trees
like starch-white spectres

to carry your weight
to your destination. 




Bio for Doryn Herbst

Doryn Herbst, a former water industry scientist in Wales, now lives in Germany and is a deputy local councillor. Her writing considers the natural world but also themes which address social issues.

Doryn has poetry in Fahmidan Journal, CERASUS Magazine, Fenland Poetry Journal, celestite poetry, Poems from the Heron Clan and more.

She is a reviewer at Consilience science poetry.

Return to the Garden poetry by Robert Fleming

Return to the Garden (Dedicated to Joni Mitchell)

apple trees are under the sky but need a roof		Eve needs sky

pear trees are soiled but need a linoleum floor	         Adam needs soil

cherry trees are in open space but need walls		Jack needs open space

banana trees have sap but need blood			        Jill needs sap
 
move the orchard inside the house			        return all humans under the sky



Bio: Robert Fleming lives in Lewes, DE. Published in United States, Canada, and Australia. Member of the Rehoboth Beach, Eastern Shore, and Horror Writer’s Association. 2022 winner of San Gabriel Valley CA broadside-1 poem, 2021 winner of Best of Mad Swirl poetry and nominated for Pushcart Prize by Ethel Zine and FailBetter and double nominated for best of the net by Devil’s Party Press. Follow Robert at https://www.facebook.com/robert.fleming.5030 .