2 poems by Gayle J. Greenlea about Going to Space (anniversary of the moonwalk)

Moon Landing, Buzz Aldrin, America, 1969

Overview Effect

I stare for hours from my window into Space,
earth-gaze over milk-crust horizons of the moon.

‘Splanchnon’, the Greeks called the visceral
tenderness my home inspires, fragile in a universe
expanding: brilliant blue dot, curtained in auroras
against a backdrop of infinity. Milky Way stars
chase lights of cities waking and going to sleep;
terrain of ocean, mountain, jungle, desert.

Separateness is illusion.

Precarious paper shield skies cradle our planet.
In cosmic perspective, I comprehend
‘oneness’ as we travel together around our star-sun.
No boundaries, no borders, a perfect sphere. Oasis
at the centre of nothingness. Hope against the void.

We have one destiny. No astronaut visits
the stars and comes back unchanged. Of all the views
from our windows, this is the one emblazoned
in modern memory.

Small planet,
bravely rising from a dark abyss
to strike another soutenu around the sun.

Astronaut

When I was nine,
I decided to be an astronaut.
Barefoot in wet grass,
holding my father’s hand,
listening to cricket song
and squinting up at the moon,
certain I could see
the first man walking there,
black and white like the image on TV.

I wanted to moonbounce,
tether myself to a spaceship
instead of Earth,
feel rocket boosters fire
me to another world.

Breathing the scent of honeysuckle,
I sucked the nectered stamens.
Floating free of gravity,
I took a giant leap
for humankind.

Poetry Showcase from Gayle J. Greenlea

A Fevers of the Mind Quick-9 Interview with Gayle J Greenlea

Wolfpack Contributor: Gayle J Greenlea

New poems from Gayle J. Greenlea : “Grey” & “Mapping the Long Haul”(revised)

Bio: Gayle J. Greenlea is a poet and counselor for survivors of sexual and gender-related violence. Her poem, “Wonderland”, received the Australian Poetry Prod Award in 2011. She shortlisted and longlisted for the Fish Poetry Prize in 2013, and debuted her first novel, Zero Gravity, at the KGB Literary Bar in Manhattan in 2016. Her work appears in St. Julian Press, Rebelle Society, A Time to Speak, Headline Poetry and Press, The Wombwell Rainbow, and Life in Quarantine (Stanford).

A Fevers of the Mind Quick-9 Interview with Lynn-Cee Faulk

with Lynn-Cee Faulk

Q1: When did you start writing and first influences?

Lynn: I first started writing when I was around eight. I wrote a poem about trees coming to life that was largely influenced by C.S. Lewis and the Chronicles of Narnia

Q2: Who are your biggest influences today?

Lynn: My fellow indie authors, Logan Ryan Smith, Cassondra Windwalker, and Micah Thomas just to name a few.

Q3: Where did you grow up and how did that influence your writing?

Lynn: I grew up in southern Georgia. I like to talk about some of my experiences growing up in my poetry but it doesn’t influence my fiction as much

Q4: Have any travels away from home help influence your work?

Lynn: Unfortunately, I haven’t had the chance to travel much but I hope to change that in the future.

Q5: Any pivotal moment when you knew you wanted to be a writer?

Lynn: I think I always knew but I had no doubt after I wrote that first poem.

Q6: Favorite activities to relax?

Lynn: I would like to be a television writer so I like to spend time watching television for inspiration.

Q7: Any recent or forthcoming projects that you’d like to promote?

Lynn: My latest release, Blood on the Vine, is a poetry collection available through amazon. https://www.amazon.com/Blood-Vine-Lynn-Cee-Faulk-ebook/dp/B08PT521C7/ref=sr_1_18?dchild=1&keywords=blood+on+the+vine&qid=1624917071&sr=8-18 

Q8: What is a favorite line/stanza from a poem of yours or others?

Lynn: “Listen – the thrumming drumming silence of nonsense taken with a teaspoon of water.”

Q9: Who has helped you most with writing?

Lynn: Micah Thomas has been my creative partner on numerous projects and always pushes me to do my best work.

https://www.lynn-ceefaulk.com/

A Fevers of the Mind Quick-9 Interview with Susan Richardson

with Susan Richardson:

Q1: When did you start writing and first influences?

Susan: I have been writing since I was a child, and like most children, I started with stories. I didn’t start writing poetry until I was in my teens, and then in my twenties started submitting my work to magazines and journals. My first poetry influences were Plath, Sexton and Olds; some of my favourite fiction writers are Amy Tan, Alice Hoffman and Jane Austen.

Q2: Who are your biggest influences today?

Susan: Sylvia Plath will always be one of my biggest influences; her work taught me what poetry could do, the power and the beauty of it. There are so many amazing contemporary poets, it is hard to choose who influences me most, but to name a few; June Jordan, Dorianne Laux and Kim Addonizio.

Q3: Where did you grow up and how did that influence your writing?

Susan: I grew up in a small beach town in California, and although I don’t see it as a huge influence on my writing, it does make some appearances on occasion in my poems.

Q4: Have any travels away from home influence your work?

Susan: I recently moved from California to Ireland and I am definitely finding myself inspired in new ways; it makes a difference when everywhere you look, the landscape is breathtaking

Q5: Any pivotal moment when you knew you wanted to be a writer?

Susan: The moment when I became a writer happened when I was six years old. Each student in my first grade class was asked to write a story about Thanksgiving; most of the kids wrote stories about pilgrims and holiday feasts, but I wrote a story about a turkey who walks in front of a car so he won’t be killed for Thanksgiving dinner. It was called “The Sad Turkey” Heavy stuff perhaps, for a six year old child, but I believe that story defined me as a writer.

Q6: Favorite activities to relax?

Susan: I have always loved to read. I also crochet, which I find relaxing, and I am getting into gardening.

Q7: Any recent or forthcoming projects that you’d like to promote?

Susan: https://t.co/OCFUweyBU2 full length collection, “Things My Mother Left Behind”, is available from Potter’s Grove Press Books to read for 2021: Things My Mother Left Behind by Susan Richardson (Potter’s Grove Press) with “Leaves” from the book

Link for book: https://t.co/BKthMciCyF, and I am working on a new project that I am super excited about, but the details are still under wraps. 

Q8: What is a favorite line/stanza from a poem of yours or others?

Susan: I don’t really have one specific line from any of my own poems that I can call my favourite, but I do have moments when I am writing when the words just seem to come together in ways that make me excited.  One of my favourite lines from Sylvia Plath, a line that inspired me to get serious about poetry, is from Mad Girl’s Love Song – “I shut my eyes, and all the world drops dead”.  

Q9: Who has helped you most with writing?

Susan: I have had a handful of incredible teachers who encouraged me to keep writing, also my Mom and Dad, who both loved poetry and music, and my husband, who is my biggest supporter.

Poem by Susan Richardson : “Mean Girls”

https://burninghousepress.com/2018/06/23/3-poems-by-susan-richardson/

A Fevers of the Mind Quick-9 Interview with Stephanie K. Merrill

with Stephanie K. Merrill

Q1: When did you start writing and first influences?

Stephanie: My parents gave me a five-year-diary for Christmas when I was in the fourth grade. I began writing every day about all the mundane things I thought I should be writing about. First influences? The language of chantings, prayers, and songs from the Roman Catholic mass were early influences along with hearing my grandmother’s colorful stories about everything and about everyone.

Q2: Who are your biggest influences today?

Stephanie: It’s hard to name just one influence because it is a gestalt of so many, but the “leaping poems” of Antonio Machado continue to influence me. I like poems that move upward, that take the reader someplace new. Jean Valentine, too, for the spaces in her text that beg the reader to reflect along the way of even a short piece.

Q3: Where did you grow up and how did that influence your writing? Have any travels away from home influence your work?

Stephanie: I grew up on a farm on the High Plains of southwestern Kansas. Growing up on the wide prairie with big skies and an only tree here and there has honed my ability to embrace solitude and the reflection that makes my writing practice feel like home.

Q4: What do you consider your most meaningful work you’ve done creatively so far?

Stephanie: When I retired from teaching high school English after a 39 year career, I was invited to deliver the commencement address to the graduating class from the school where I’d recently retired. I ended the address with a poem, and I had the nerve to call it a love poem to the students, to the parents, to all alumni, and to anyone associated in the past, present, and future with the school. It was an awesome experience to have one simple poem speak on such a grand scale.

Q5: Any pivotal moment when you knew you wanted to be a writer?

Stephanie: There has not been a pivotal moment for me, but so many “awe” moments when a work of art, a song, a piece of literature has moved me. In each of those moments, I’m always reminded of how much power there is in this elevated communication, and in those moments, I always want to participate.

Q6: Favorite activities to relax?

Stephanie: I play the piano. I drink tea with our three cats. I walk in the arroyos on the trails outside of Austin where I live.

Q7: Any recent or forthcoming projects that you’d like to promote?

Stephanie: No

Q8: What is a favorite line/stanza from a poem of yours or others?

Stephanie:

I love old dogs, too./ The ones who place their serious paws / on my face, telling me to go read / The Tibetan Book of the Dead one more time– / that if I am too clever / I will miss the point entirely

(from “Some Celestial Event” published in UCity Review:

http://www.ucityreview.com/22_Merrill_Stephanie_K.html )

Q9: Who has helped you most with writing?

Stephanie: All the open-hearted and open-minded teenagers with whom I have shared writing classrooms over the years.

http://www.ucityreview.com/22_Merrill_Stephanie_K.html

https://feralpoetry.net/two-poems-by-stephanie-k-merrill/