A Fevers of the Mind Quick-9 Interview with Charlotte Oliver

with Charlotte Oliver:

Q1: When did you start writing and first influences?

Charlotte: I started writing poetry as a little girl, inspired by my mum and my grandma reading delicious rhyming poems aloud to me, like The Highwayman by Alfred Noyes – that one used to thrill and terrify me, and I loved it! I carried on until after university but stopped as life got busier and I’ve only returned to it in earnest this past year.

Q2: Who are your biggest influences today?

Charlotte: Most recently, Roger Robinson, Wendy Pratt, Tony Curry, John McCulloch, Clare Shaw, Robert Frede Kenter, Anna Saunders and Elisabeth Kelly. They’ve all written incredible words that never seem far from my thoughts at the moment.

Audacity Of Form by Robert Frede Kenter – IceFloe Press

Q3: Where did you grow up and how did that influence your writing?

Charlotte: I’ve lived in Liverpool, London, Suffolk and Brazil but Scarborough has always been my true home and I adore it; the sea, the tourists, the ghosts of its grand past, the empty beach in Winter – it is endlessly inspiring!

Q4: What do you consider your most meaningful work you’ve done creatively so far?

Charlotte: Always the poems I have written for my husband.

Q5: Any pivotal moment when you knew you wanted to be a writer?

Charlotte: I’ve always been creative but the crunch came a few years ago when I was sitting at my desk job in the NHS. I knew I was losing myself and my excitement at the world (and everything I could see was beige!). I heard myself resign and here I am, poorer but fulfilled.

Q6: Favorite activities to relax?

Charlotte: Being outdoors, preferably by or in the sea.

Q7: Any recent or forthcoming projects that you’d like to promote?

Charlotte: I’m very exited to have had a poem accepted for Ice Floe Press’s Pandemic Love and Other Affinities anthology which will be out later in the summer. I’ve also got a few other things out there that I am hoping for news of very soon…

Q8: What is a favorite line/stanza from a poem of yours or others?

Charlotte: My poem Bee, starts ‘Flying crumb of tiger’. I’m proud of that.

Q9: Who has helped you most with writing?

Charlotte: Wendy Pratt’s (@wondykitten) courses and mentoring has been invaluable to me, as has the Word Central gang’s warmth and welcome each month at their Zoom poetry evenings. Every act of connection with the lovely poetry community has helped me move forwards and, of course, my ever-patient and wonderful husband.

Links:

(Twitter: @charlotteolivr        insta: charlotteoliverpoet)

Poem by Charlotte Oliver :The Cleaning of my Heart

Wolfpack Contributor Bio: Charlotte Oliver

3 new poems by Charlotte Oliver “Nobody Knew” “As Perseus” & “You May Write Me Down in History”

https://charlotteoliver.com/

https://www.1handclapping.online/post/charlotte-oliver-a-poem

https://icefloepress.net/2020/11/22/a-poem-by-charlotte-oliver-with-a-photograph-by-robynne-limoges/

A Fevers of the Mind Quick-9 Interview with Anton Pooles

with Anton Pooles:

Q1: When did you start writing and first influences?

Anton:

I have always love fairy tales and fantasy, but I never planned on becoming a writer or more specifically a poet. I struggled with reading and writing as a child, and honestly still do, so I had
probably convinced myself I could never be a writer, but somehow, I fell into it. In my mid-twenties I re-discovered many of the Arthurian Romance poems that I had enjoyed reading when I was in
high school and I started writing poems in that style. Poems like “Sir Gawain and the Green Knight” and “Lady of the Lake” by Sir Walter Scott we defiantly my entry point for poetry. The plan
was to add these poems into the fairy stories I was writing at the time, but it opposite occurred and the fairy stories found their way into the poems.

Q2: Who are your biggest influences today?

Anton:

I’m often find I am more heavily influenced through visual mediums like film and art than I am with writing. I struggled with reading a great deal when I was a child and still do honestly, but I have
always been in love with film. Most of my greatest influencers have been filmmaker like Fritz Lang and Andrei Tarkovsky. One of the most important would have to be Guillermo Del Toro. He has
become a kind of spiritual mentor of mine.

Q3: Where did you grow up and how did that influence your writing?

Anton: I was raised in Toronto, but I’m not sure it has ever influenced my writing a great deal. However, there are two places I always seem to come back to. The first is a cottage in Brighton, Ontario that
my parents had when I was a child. I spent a good chuck of my childhood there and so it has become the location for a lot of my poems. The second is the city I was born in, which was
Novosibirsk, Siberia. I left when I was a baby, I have never been back and I have no memory of it, but it gnaws at me as a good ghost should.

Q4: Have any travels away from home influence your writing?

Anton: I have always been fascinated by Vincent Van Gogh and I have always wanted to write something about him. I got the chance to go to the South of France a few years ago and I was able to visit and stay in certain places that he had been. That got me working on a series of poems about him. So, I guess the answer is, yes.

Q5: Any pivotal moment when you knew you wanted to be a writer?

Anton: I’m sure there was, but I can’t remember. Sorry.

Q6: Favorite activities to relax?

Anton: As I said before I LOVE film. Last year I watched over two hundred films. I know that may seem
like a lot, but I need the images they supply, they feed the mind.

Q7: Any recent or forthcoming projects that you’d like to promote?

Anton: I am Editor-in-Chief of Cypress: Literary Journal where we publish poetry and flash fiction/non-fiction. We are always open for submission and publish writers worldwide. We have also published
our first print anthology not to long ago called “The Red House: An Anthology of Genre and Speculative Poetry” which is still available.
https://cypresspress.ca/

Q8: What is a favorite line/stanza from a poem of yours or others?

Anton: “I keep the dead alive by walking on winter nights. My visible breath passes into their invisible lungs.” This is from a poem I’m working on called “Lamplight.”

Q9: Who has helped you most with writing?

Anton: I took a poetry class at the University of Toronto and my instructor was Catherine Graham. She taught me how to bring the fantastical into the modern era without losing any whimsy in the
process. This is, of course, something I greatly admire in her own writing as well. Her collection “Winterkill” had a profound impact on me.

https://heavyfeatherreview.org/2021/05/19/pooles/

https://thewombwellrainbow.com/2020/07/15/four-poems-visual-art-anton-pooles/

https://icefloepress.net/2020/07/15/four-poems-visual-art-anton-pooles/

https://www.ekphrastic.net/ekphrastic-journal/garden-of-death-by-anton-pooles

A Fevers of the Mind Quick-9 Interview with Mary Jaimes-Serrano

200+ "Mary Serrano" profiles | LinkedIn

with Mary Jaimes-Serrano

Q1: When did you start writing and first influences?

Mary: I started writing when I was 8 years old. My first influences were Poe, Shakespeare, and Jane Austen.

Q2: Who are your biggest influences today?

Mary: There are so many. The biggest would still be Jane Austen. Newer influences are Maya Angelou, Elisabeth Horan, Ankh Spice, Robert Frede Kenter, Amanda McLeod, Beth Gordon, David Hanlon, MJ Saucer, and Jude Marr.

Q3: Where did you grow up and how did that influence your writing? Have any travels away from home influence your work?

Mary: I grew up all over the U.S. We moved a lot, which taught me to value the time I had and take in the beauty of the world around me. It also gave me an insight into the cruelties that persist throughout the country, which has led to a desire to be a positive influence in the face of so much darkness.

Q4: What do you consider the most meaningful work that you’ve done creatively so far?

Mary: I would have to say the book I am currently working on titled Duplicity, which is about the effects of bipolar and the aftermath of emotional and mental abuse.

Q5: Any pivotal moment when you knew you wanted to be a writer?

Mary: I knew I wanted to be a writer from a very young age. My first writings were poems about everything when I was eight. This turned into a passionate desire when I found in poetry a way to write out the feelings I wasn’t allowed to express in my daily life.

Q6: Favorite activities to relax?

Mary: Spending time with my children doing just about anything, watching crime tv, and reading.

Q7: Any recent or forthcoming projects that you’d like to promote?

Mary: I am currently reworking my blog mjaimesserrano.com from a poetry platform to a blog of emotional and mental abuse. Something that will help others out there know they are not alone and that it is okay to walk away.

Q8: What is a favorite line/stanza from a poem of yours or others?

From my poem Soulmates:

Soulmates are not the embodiment of
love, but the infinite
love of one’s being.

Q9: Who has helped you most with writing?

Mary: So many people from the #poetrycommunity have helped me to hone my craft and encouraged me to find my voice. Notably are Elisabeth Horan, Beth Gordon, Amanda McLeod, Robert Frede Kenter, MJ Saucer, and Gabriela Blandy.

Links:

https://thepoetryquestion.com/2020/03/16/tpq5-mary-jaimes-serrano/

A Fevers of the Mind Quick-9 Interview with M.S. Evans

with M.S. Evans

Q1: When did you start writing and first influences?

M.S.: I started writing when I was very young, but didn’t share any of it. In 2019 I gave myself permission to finally go for it.

Q2: Who are your biggest influences today?

M.S.: I’m currently diving into work by Bukowski, Louise Gluck and Franz Wright. Tom Waits is a musical constant

Q3: Where did you grow up and how did that influence your writing/art?

M.S.: I grew up in in Seattle, in an old farmhouse. It’d been a speakeasy during the Prohibition era and strange things happened to everyone that stayed there.
Nature in the Pacific NW influenced me deeply. I became involved in environmental activism at a young age, which led me to the labor movement.
Nature, ghosts, and activism are definitely recurring topics in my writing.

Apparently Gary Snyder grew up in the same neighborhood. I like to think there’s a rebellious nature spirit there that drops in on kids’ dreams.

Q4: Have any travels away from home influence your work?

M.S.: In 2010 I traveled to Wales to meet my penpal. I married him, poor bloke. His belief in me has been invaluable.

Q5: Any pivotal moment when you knew you wanted to be a writer/artist?

M.S.: I’ve always had a drive to capture what I witness. Before I owned a camera or started really writing, this desire to capture a moment was like a physical pain.
I knew I had a unique perspective, but I’ve not always been sure how to share it, or if anyone would appreciate it. I’m still not sure, but that doesn’t seem to matter now.

Q6: Favorite activities to relax?

M.S.: Making art: linocuts, dolls, jewelry, painting. Walking, taking photographs. daydreaming. Sometimes all at once.

(Some pins I made getting a little extra UV curing: Mary MacLane, James Joyce, Linton Kwesi Johnson.)

Q7: Any recent or forthcoming projects that you’d like to promote?

M.S.: I’m currently working on my first poetry collection, and also cooking up a project with Ice Floe Press where I’ll be a guest reader.

My first exhibit, “Permanent Migrant” is now wrapping up here in Butte.

Q8: What is a favorite line/stanza from one of your poem/writings or others?

M.S.:

“Roll rough Yiddish,
like bone dice
against a home’s foundation.”

-from “Red Shadows”, Ice Floe Press, 2020.

Q9: Who has helped you most with writing?

M.S.: I’m indebted to Matthew M C Smith of Black Bough Poetry for his mentorship. Through Matthew I also met Robert Frede Kenter, a gentle, intuitive editor. They’ve both shown me so much kindness. I hope to pay it forward someday

Links:

Wolfpack Contributor Bio: M.S. Evans

Photography Art by M.S. Evans

3 poems from M.S. Evans from Fevers of the Mind Press Anthology

Twitter: @SeaNettleink

https://icefloepress.net/2020/06/02/butte-america-poems-and-photos-by-m-s-evans/

https://icefloepress.net/pandemic-politics-3-poems/

https://www.blackboughpoetry.com/m-s-evans

https://feralpoetry.net/three-love-poems-by-m-s-evans/

https://www.greeninkpoetry.co.uk/poetry-submissions-all/ms-evans-grief-stones

https://stoneofmadnesspress.com/ms-evans

A Fevers of the Mind Quick-9 Interview with Margaret Viboolsittiseri aka Maggs Vibo

Thanks to Maggs for designing our Q9 Logos

with Maggs Vibo

Q1: When did you start writing/art and first influences?

Maggs: My Grandma used to call me an old soul during our conversations. She said that adults enjoyed my stories and songs. For learning, she advised wandering outside and listening to the teachings of nature. My Mom advised burning sage and handed me a paintbrush to deal with problems. My Dad advised defying dogma and looking to the cosmos for purpose. My influencers were artists because my parents loved art. Music filled our home and pondered war, art, feminism, drugs, and the government. Artists provided lyrical inspiration for the big and small questions in life. My childhood was a time of exploration and imagination. I suppose nowadays society calls this a free-range childhood. A sense of freedom is my earliest recollection of poetry and art.

Dad playing fiddle

Q2: Who has inspired or helped you the most with writing?

Maggs: All the great crafters of lore… especially Niki de Saint Phalle. I’ve always admired the way she morphed storytelling her trauma into an art triumph.

Niki de Saint Phalle at Atlanta, GA (2006)

Q3: Where did you grow up and how did that influence your writing/art?

Maggs: My family lived on farms in the Heartland of the United States. It was an excellent opportunity to observe the natural world. Folklore is embedded in art because of oral storytelling traditions. Today we use memes and other technologies, but it is just a continuation of ancient stories told in new ways with new methods. Everything I learned about animals and the countryside, along with old fables and tales, influences my art today.

Q4: Have any travels away from home influenced work/describe?

Maggs: My first trip abroad was for a Nanny gig in Canberra, Australia. I’ve deployed as a GWOT soldier. Additionally, military assignments took my spouse (a soldier) and me (his spouse) to Europe, Asia and Hawaii. I feel privileged to write about these multicultural experiences. I never take for granted the circumstances (wars) which led to the opportunities.

Maggs Vibo and CW4 Wattana Viboolsittiseri aboard USS Missouri, 2017

Q5: What do you consider the most meaningful work you’ve done creatively so far?

Maggs: My work in the military community over the past two decades is the most meaningful. It started with art I contributed to events commemorating the fallen. Later, I wrote an article about an Army staff sergeant named Daniel A. Bader. In 2004, a college literary journal published a poem I wrote about an experience during one of my convoys near what was known as Tallil Air Base (located in Nasiriyah, Iraq). I created pieces for the Veterans Writing Project (including a journal written by all women and an anthology covering 2012-2017). In 2018, I collaborated with Jerri Bell and Tracy Crow on women warrior history programs for the National Park Service. In 2020, Oxford Brookes University invited me to a poetry workshop facilitated by Niall Munro, Susie Campbell, and Jane Potter. It was an intimate gathering of women veterans from the US and UK which studied war and poetry. From this workshop, and other veterans’ poetry workshops, the Oxford Brookes Poetry Centre published ‘My teeth don’t chew on shrapnel’: an anthology of poetry by military veterans (a free pdf available for download at: https://www.brookes.ac.uk/poetry-centre/veterans–poetry-workshops/). This meaningful work led to many collaborative projects outside the military community. Nowadays, I try to engage at least once a quarter in programs which help bridge the civilian and military divide.

Women’s History Program at Prince George County Regional Heritage Center, L to R: Jerri Bell, Reinetta VanEendenburg, Ranger Maggs Vibo and Tracy Crow, 2018.

Q6: Any pivotal moment when you knew you wanted to be an artist/poet?

Maggs: All throughout my childhood I was regarded as a nerdy thespian. I sang songs, danced poorly, walked around with paint under my fingernails and boasted my participation in art and drama club. The death of my grandpa had a big impact on my writing. I wrote a short story which discussed his leg amputation and mobility challenges. In the essay, I talked about his alcohol abuse, use of painkillers and how addiction led to his downward health spiral. My short story placed at state competition. I was invited to a soiree where my parents and friends watched me receive a plaque. This was my first recognition for writing. More than anything, I remember how telling my truth helped my family process our collective grief. The essay is stored inside a cedar chest Dad crafted for safekeeping all of my Mom’s favorite things.

Q7: Favorite activities to relax?

Maggs: I like to cycle the Virginia Capital Trail to the marina to have a local brew, catch the sun on the water and cycle back home to spend time with my two dogs. If it involves being outside in nature (or staring lovingly at my dogs) I regard it as true bliss.

Q8: One of your favorite lines from your poem/song, or favorite piece of art of photograph.

Maggs: Favorite line from a poet is Walt Whitman’s “Do I contradict myself?” As a Park Ranger, I gave battlefield interpretive tours out at Petersburg National Battlefield. Each tour discussed the ways contradiction exists in telling the stories of the American Civil War… and all the other conflicts throughout history. Favorite singer: Neil Finn. Favorite book: Black Elk Speaks. Favorite art: ancient art. Favorite movie: Paprika (2006 film). Favorite photograph: NASA image of boot print on the lunar soil.

Pu’uloa Petroglyphs, Big Island, Hawaii, 2014

Q9 Any recent or forthcoming projects you’d like to promote?

I have a visual poetry piece on exhibition until the end of summer in Virginia. I also work forthcoming in 2 pubs from Paris and a journal from South Asia (all before the end of summer, 2021). I am thrilled to have 10 pieces in Experiment-0, Issue 14, Autumn 2021 Release. The rest is listed on Poemythology.com

Links:

Website: poemythology.com

Photography from Maggs Vibo : Lone Road on Island of Moloka’i I Don’t Need Anesthesia: Photo Art & Poetry by Maggs Vibo

Poem by Maggs Vibo : “Naked”

Fevers of the Mind Fog by Maggs Vibo (photography/art)

Juneteenth Morning by Maggs Vibo

Wolfpack Contributor Bio: Maggs Vibo

Visual Poetry by Maggs Vibo : the Year of the Ox

New Collage Art by Maggs Vibo

Visual Poetry by Maggs Vibo: Drinking the Ash Pt 1 & 2

https://icefloepress.net/2020/11/15/half-breed-drive-a-visual-poem-by-maggs-vibo-pt-1-of-a-maggs-vibo-feature/

https://thepoetryquestion.com/2021/02/19/tpq5-maggs-vibo/

https://thewombwellrainbow.com/2020/11/20/nema-a-poetry-film-by-maggs-vibo/

https://radar.brookes.ac.uk/radar/items/dd9d92c2-a37c-4816-b409-5a911d2d88e1/1/

https://smallmachinetalks.com/index.php/tag/maggs-vibo/

https://tinyseedjournal.com/2020/11/03/eastern-tiger-swallowtail-caterpillar/