Book Review for Jeff Parent ‘This Bygone Route’ review by Maid Corbic

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Jeff Parent @yuppoems on Twitter

“This Bygone Route” is one wonderful book collection that continues to conquer the entire world. In each poem we can find knowledge of the world and of what we may present ourselves today; his words are still very large and steady no matter what else they say. Struggling with himself and his ego, he continues to revive his deeds in beautiful deeds that are instructive to all of us, not just him. Many of these poems that I have read are very important, so they talk about life, the real state of man and emotions that are trivial, equally persistent, and they can always tell us about life that is equal. Of course, everything we experience is just one real situation that we have to overcome with courage and equality, and this collection of books shows us just that.

A special stylistic text describes all the poems I have read and are metrically very accurate. It is very difficult to see that today. This collection is also very wonderful as it also has many lyrical images; describes nature, a man who always tries to fight what is still stable and flat for him, with human epithets and times that are bad for him. His stage of life as well as his thinking itself gradually changes when he realizes that he can no longer hold on to equality and words that continued to become harder and harder for him. A collection that always gives selectness, is always concisely worded every one of his works that carries multiple messages; the struggle for rights, unrequited love or those conditions that we have to worry about, mentally where many today no longer care about it and create dangerous barriers. Every goal must also justify the means, because only in this way can we declare a story to be realistic and enduring. Not otherwise.


The struggle is present and the passion for a man to wake up from some daydreams like a phoenix and to rise far regardless of the events around him. The name of the collection itself can carry a lot of forty-one poems, each of which is fantastic in its own way, and each of them shows an explicit desire and opportunity to progress in this world that has continued to become unsettled. Times change and life slowly begins to get harder and harder, but the author does not give up so easily either; he reciprocates his energies in each poem and proves that the world around him is still dignified and colorful, and that in the end he has reason to live another year in happiness and peace, and not just be one sad black bird that has to fly from one end. on the other. He still carried sin in some poems, but that does not mean that he is a sinner. On the contrary, he is a very strong man who shows time and direction in every poem, a direction he deserves to proudly carry in the depths of his woven soul, because he values around himself the best deeds and works that other people bring him.

Of all the poems, “Eclipse Year” is the most realistic because it is about the author himself who is trying to find his peace in his world and to live some of his unfulfilled dreams, because he wanted to be still alive; only he felt he was trapped between two lines and no longer had a reason to live some of his cherished dreams. But on the contrary, he believed, as in many poems, that God is only one and that everything he creates is really just his thought that made him think of others maybe some bad things and maybe he did not dream or want that. He believed that there must be a story behind every corner that would lead him to some small details that would eventually lead to even bigger ones, but he thought that time did best. This is what the narrative of the poem itself says, the year of the turning point and the environment in which he finds himself, and it is time to finally dedicate himself and realize all his dreams until he finally becomes an old man and where he will still not be able to work and dream all his dreams. the desires he dreamed; because his reality was still on shaky ground. The year of cataclysm, to put it mildly, this poems says that we still have to be strong and look forward as always, not to think black things because that’s the only way those that we don’t want to see and feel can happen to us, because the worst defeat is when we declare without any warning beforehand. Year after year, some things will improve. Nothing will ever stay so dark and that justice must always win in the end.

“Coming home” means one part of the song in which the author sets himself in plans and wishes, but he slowly realizes it. He lives in an ideal world where nothing is equal to him, but he is afraid of being so doomed in that reality, because he must value himself first and foremost and ultimately be the leader of his dreams that he realizes. He wanted everything he did to be only in his mind and that one day if he was lucky and accomplished. This poem is thoughtful, but of course it takes on great significance because the lack of the figure of an important person still leaves a trace of the great in the heart that cannot be healed so easily, as for example his father when he loved very much and I would give anything for him. Nothing happened just so by accident and he had to believe that between waking and dreaming there is only one wish and thought, and that is a better and more beautiful world that awaits him one day when he disappears. The belief is that the world is one steam engine that leads to the end and that revision is always just his life, which no longer makes sense because of a very important figure. Some things cannot be repeated together as before.


“Humidex” is also a great poem that says that the title is first and foremost very special and that it fits in brilliantly about these happenings, is the self-awareness it holds. Psychologically speaking, metrically correct. Many competitions can achieve exceptional work, but of course its message is numerous, which the author must eventually find a solution on his own and be guided by thoughts that have become very difficult for him, because the song itself requires a lot of concentration. But far from true, of course this is a poem that has emotions and style in it, it has colors and comparisons even.

I was especially impressed by the fact that it is very nicely decorated in a visual sense; from margins to padding, to numbering, and from poems to lyrical images to metaphors – in one place everything can be found very easily and in an assistant. All the titles of the poems are very ingenious and creative, each author can find inspiration for some future works that he will have and that in the end he creates something that no one else could, and that is diversity.

With forty-one pages, forty-one possible visions of the world, I still have a strong impression after reading, so it is true that this book may be extremely incomprehensible for beginners, but for professionals it is very clear and helpful.


“Acid Rain Day” is a poem that is presented in the most beautiful light. It is one of the long poems that are free forms, as well as many poems that you will read here of course with great joy, it is wonderful when that love is still cultivated sincere and pure, which is drinkable according to the times to come, nature and culture of living on which we observe “for granted”. Much is offered here, from family values to encouragement in every desire, for yet the courage today is that anything can be done, and be warted to ruin. It all makes you laugh when you are a parent who puts herself in her roots and supports the virgin, not to cry and be happy when she lives her true dream that must come true anyway. It is the poem that talks about parenthood, courage and the very culture of living, the epilogue of the event is all the memories of the window that are watched in silence.

It is important to say that everything is very nicely packaged, from the composition of the parents to the black bird that flies silently in songs, sometimes a happy epilogue and sometimes sad give a psychological meaning to a person to develop his writing and focus on a reality that never she was no closer. After reading this you can be very proud of yourself, because it is wonderful at the end of each work to realize that there are some emotions that you also live, that we all live. That is why the poems serve us, as well as Acid Rain Day to show that there is joy between every sorrow, even though it is the window of the observer’s eye, it depends on the time we live in, so it will be for us. And I, I tell you to read this book and to happily share your advice with everyone around you, because only in this way can some things be experienced and be as wonderful and fabulous as ever. In the end, the message of this book is to love yourself, to empathize with others, and to live always, but always for your dreams and desires that you have buried in your memory data, part of the real brain.

Wolfpack Contributor Bio: Maid Corbic

A Book Review for Steve Denehan “The Streets, Like Flowers, Come Alive in the Rain” Review by Georgia Hilton

The Streets, Like Flowers, Come Alive in the Rain: Poetry Collection by [Steve Denehan]

https://amzn.to/3jWEMUq

The Streets, Like Flowers, Come Alive in The Rain,
(Steve Denehan, Potter’s Grove Press, 2021)

The first impression a reader may have when encountering Steve Denehan’s new collection is that the author has found his version of the good life and is unapologetically living it. There’s little poetic angst here – The Streets, Like Flowers, Come Alive in the Rain is quietly life-affirming and uplifting, but never corny or overly sentimental. Instead, it revels in the knowledge that joy arrives quietly, without fanfare, in small domestic moments. Take the poem ‘Rain’, where the author reflects that ‘happiness comes easy these days’, and that after searching for it for years, he realises ‘it was there all along/ hiding in plain sight/ in the folds of that old woollen blanket/ in the press filled with lunchboxes and Tupperware.’

That’s not to say that Denehan shies away from the difficult subjects, far from it. In The Tossed Coins of John Canning, the poet’s family meets a homeless man ‘a hard life behind him/a harder one to come’. Discovering that he is also a poet ‘of wrong turns/ and bad calls’, Denehan muses that ‘it could have been me/ could still be yet.’ This is someone who never takes his version of the good life for granted, who knows that everything can change in a heartbeat. Perhaps this is the key to the sense of quiet gratitude that permeates this collection.

Denehan is a humane, compassionate writer, but he also gives wry expression to some of the absurdities of modern life. In The High Cost of Breathing, Denehan recounts his disbelief at ‘The Oxygen Bar’, where he encounters a dozen people ‘smiling under oxygen masks/ breathing pure air/scented with flowers and butterscotch’. In Destination Restaurant, the poet can’t hide his revulsion at the ‘guffaw…of a truffle scoffing, oily-mouthed snob’. Denehan picks apart the absurdity and pretension of modern life with skilful precision, whilst reminding us of what’s really important – meaningful relationships with those we love.

It’s no surprise then that the most memorable poems are those written about Denehan’s daughter, Robin, who provides the foreword for the book. In One More Week, Robin writes a poem about her grandfather – ‘having read it/ I was quiet/ while I waited/ for the lump in my throat to subside’. In The Dance Class he muses that ‘inside her chest there are no corners/ her blood/ and some of mine/ dark fire dancing…with the only music that really matters.’

This is a collection primarily concerned with what really matters. It never sacrifices sincerity for artfulness but is nonetheless accomplished. As Robin herself says of her Dad’s writing – ‘his poems always make me think.’

Georgia Hilton

Wolfpack Contributor Bio: Georgia Hilton

The Featured Poetry Showcase for Steve Denehan

A Book Review of Pen Muses a compilation of 60 poems by Sarika Jaswani (reviewed by Mashaal Sajid)

Pen Muses

Pen Muses is a compilation of 60 Poems by Poet and Artist Sarika Jaswani. Known for her ArtInCrochet nonprofit and fundraising for various underprivileged schools around the world,
Sarika is a certified crochet instructor and art tutor. She has authored original children’s stories in the series ‘Life is Magical’ to go with crochet toys in her shop. Her books are available at
Kindle and BN.com. Sarika’s poetry has been published on The “Tide Rises, The Tide Falls”, “A Cornered Gurl Publication”, and “Fevers Of The Mind

This is an emotive and relatable collection of poems on a diverse range of topics from love, grief, heartache, and sorrow to desire, hope and personal reflections on the complexities of time
and human emotions. Abound with imagery from the natural world and an empathetic poetic voice, these Poems have a soothing effect on the reader. They create a meditative and calm atmosphere replete with internal reflections and familiar emotions expressed in exquisite
language.

Some of my favorites were Aroha, An Empty Page, Limoncello Elder, Sculpture and Seven. Aroha is about separateness in relationships and love thriving despite superficial barriers.

“Willful
I shun the stigma of aging suns”

An Empty Page is about the creative process, this poem has a beautiful visual pattern that heightens/elevates the poems liquid atmosphere composed of language like: barbel, wet weight
and currency of liquid. Limoncello is a melodramatic poem about the passing of time, love and loss. Sculpture is ripe with desire and desperation and uses passionate language to express
these emotions:

“Forge me in your love
My engraver-
I’ll be a bearer of your nameSeven is another love poem, this one is on a lighter and happy note and sings the lover’s praise.

The Collection consists of a few ekphrastic poems paired with alluring photography such as Skyline, Dark Moon and The Woods. Quite a few verses captured my heart with their poignant
visual imagery of nature and others with their poetic brilliance, some of these phrases were:
“Dog-eared leaf/ with your initials/ stays mint in my elegy”, “In each vein fold of pigeon-heart petal of Chrysanthemum”, “I wear your sepia blemish/ at each vex of moon”, “allium of her life
stems in gospel truths”, “I fill each grain/ in spores of your spell”, and “I want to steal your sun/
off orchards/ be an apple to/ bathe in your sunshine”.

I was grateful for the opportunity to read and review Pen Muses. The collection has a lot of potential, the love poems are heartwarming and accessible and would make a beautiful gift to
share with someone you love or want to express your feelings to. The collection makes a light-hearted read you can enjoy and delve in at leisure, it leaves you contemplating the
bittersweetness of love, time and memory.

Brief Bio:
Crochet artist, art tutor, writer of children's stories, philanthropist. Poet. Dabbles in poetry, reading,
and writing. Art lover. Bird lover. Dreamer and blogger. Poetry published at The Tide Rises, The
Tide Falls, also on Medium @ACG.

Sarika Jaswani, under the pen name ArtInCrochet, is a decade old non-profit donating hats and
scarves to orphanages and shelter homes. She has done fundraising from 2016 through sales of handmade crochet items for kids in need. She is a certified crochet instructor from The American Craft Council. She has conducted classes at Alpharetta Main Branch Library, Art Center Alpharetta, and Michael's Community Classroom Alpharetta Georgia. Funds raised through her teaching crochet art are used to donate books to various underprivileged schools around the
world. She has authored original children's stories in the series 'Life is Magical' to go with the crochet toys in her shop. Her books are available as Nook Books on BN.com and Amazon
Kindle. Her Etsy page: https://www.etsy.com/shop/ArtInCrochet
Sarika is a passionate poetry reader and writer. Her Poetry is published on:
The Tide Rises, The Tide Falls.
Online Literary Journal
Featured in Fever Of The Mind
A Cornered Gurl publication on Medium
https://link.medium.com/LFnXDnZTGdb

Wolfpack Contributor Bio: Sarika Jaswani

Wolfpack Contributor Bio: Mashaal Sajid

Fevers of the Mind Poetry & Art Blog

  • *Donations for maintaining website costs & to help with Print Anthologies go to our paypal feversofthemind@gmail.com*
  • Submissions e-mail: feversofthemind@gmail.com  Twitter: @feversof please include an author photo, a bio, social media info if any.

Fevers of the Mind July Themes including new *Writing Prompts*

Anything unless published elsewhere will be eligible for our Fevers of the Mind Print Anthologies in the future.

Upcoming Fevers of the Mind Press Anthologies

*Fevers of the Mind Issue 5 (probably in August)

*Fevers of the Mind Issue 6 (Probably in October if not sooner)

*A Sequel Anthology to Avalanches in Poetry Writings & Art Inspired by Leonard Cohen: Submissions end on September 1st 

*Poetry, Haikus, Sonnets, Poetry book Reviews, Music Reviews, Essays, Art promotion photos, Photography, Interviews*

Open submissions with bio. Please give us up to a full month from your sent e-mail date for acceptances/rejections.  I will answer any status questions but remember to give us at least 1 month from your sent e-mail. Please let us know if something has been previously published, we will make a judgment call on whether able to include. 

Themes in addition to General Submissions could include,  #StoptheHate Social Justice Poetry, The Audrey Hepburn Challenge, LGBTQ Matters/Pride, Avalanches in Poetry 2 Writings & Art Inspired by Leonard Cohen, Mental Health, History, Old Hollywood poetry, Influenced by Anne Sexton, Sylvia Plath,  Jack Keroauc, John Lennon, Bob Dylan, Phil Ochs, Joni Mitchell, Jimi Hendrix, artists, Instrumental music, Maya Angelou, Toni Morrison, Nikki Giovanni, Rita Dove, Edgar Allan Poe, Oscar Wilde, William S. Burroughs, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, Bukowski, Langston Hughes, Robert Frost, Keats, W.B. Yeats, E.E. Cummings, James Joyce, Ginsberg, Lorca, Henry David Thoreau, Tom Waits, Townes Van Zandt, Ted Hughes, Elliott Smith, Tori Amos, Ani Difranco, Marvin Gaye and many more.

*New submissions will only be accepted for a future print anthology except from our current Wolfpack Monthly contributors, this does not include interviews and book reviews. We are now sending rejection e-mails (not a favorite thing to do) but will be necessary in this process. After a month some of the Anthology poetry could be added to the blog.*

About Editor David L O’Nan

Follow me on Twitter @DavidLONan1 

For More go to Amazon and look for the Fevers of the Mind Press Presents the Poets of 2020 Deluxe Edition paperback & kindle  Split editions Volumes 1 & 2 from the Deluxe edition available on paperback (look for post on Fevers of the Mind Press Presents the Poets of 2020 to know who are contributors in each book), Fevers of the Mind Poetry Digest Volumes 1-3 available on paperback and kindle. Also there is a Poetry Only combination book of Volumes 1 & 2:  Avalanches in Poetry: Writings & Art Inspired by Leonard Cohen available on Paperback & Kindle.   My poetry books (David L O’Nan) New Disease Streets (November 2020) The Cartoon Diaries (2019) Taking Pictures in the Dark (February 2021) Our Fears in Tunnels (2021) The Famous Poetry Outlaws are Painting Walls and Whispers (2018) Lost Reflections (2021) are all also available on Amazon.  For my Amazon Author Page (may not have all listed at first)  I have had work published in Icefloe Press, Royal Rose Magazine, Truly U, Dark Marrow an offshoot of Rhythm & Bones Lit, Ghost City,  3 Moon Publishing, Elephants Never, Nymphs Publishing, Anti-Heroin Chic & more. I have edited 5 Anthology editions & have poetry, prose, short stories, photography in Fevers of the Mind Poetry (&Art) Digest/Avalanches in Poetry Writings & Art Inspired by Leonard Cohen.  A Best of the Net Nominee for 2021.

“What The Owl Taught Me” by Annest Gwilym a poetry book review by Mashaal Sajid

What the Owl Taught Me by Annest Gwilym | North of Oxford
What The Owl Taught Me

“What the owl taught me” is Annest Gwilym’s first full-length Poetry collection published by Lapwing Publications in 2020. Having read Annest’s debut poetry chapbook “Surfacing”, I looked forward to delve into this collection and my anticipation was rewarded. A bestiary of sorts,  “what the owl taught me” is a perfect read for anyone who approaches themes of nature and wildlife with adoration and cautious reverence. 

Annest depicts the spirit of living creatures from mythological birds, sea urchin and moths to endangered critters in these 40 Poems. The collection is hallmarked with quaint verses giving human characteristics to animals like: “scuffle for a crumb on the street, sinewy legs dance and pounce”, “upright head, a Roman nose”, “shimmied and played chase with the ladies”, “underwater acrobats”, “as your mocking laughter ripples”, “he keeps vigil, forages, shovels snow”, and “in his robe of sun he cartwheels”.

Perhaps due to my biased fascination with moths, but mostly because of these opening lines “I rode through the liquid night, as a melon-slice moon crested a bank of cloud”, Last Night I Became An Emperor Moth is my favourite poem in this collection. It takes you on a first person view of a moth’s night journey, flying over moor and sea, to end in a desire filled moment with the anticipation of some obscure ferine mating ritual: “There to wait for my lover; my musk strong, / it will draw him from miles. He will come, / wings taut with blood. Antennae fresh as ferns.”

Some poems are heavy with environmentalist concern and themes of extinction. Golden child is a concrete poem about the endangered Raja Undulate sting ray, the speaker describes the beauty of the creature calling her ‘beauty queen of rays’, the voice breaks to distressed prayer towards the end: “Golden child, I pray you don’t go the way of the golden toad”. “The Last Woolly Mammoth” paints a macabre and mournful picture of the extinction of the last Woolly mammoths on Wrangel Island. Tinted with grief and loss, it features a mother child duo, the child after witnessing his mother’s death surrenders to loneliness and demise. The poem holds bitter lessons about climate crisis and environmentally harmful practices : “People have taken bones and tusks, of his dead tribe, wear his family’s coats on their backs.”

What The Owl Taught Me contains many brilliant Poems, among these, the ones that stood out to me the most are: “Last Night I Became An Emperor Moth”, “Domesticated”, “Barn Owl”, “The Nightmare Bird”, “The Moon Hedgehog”, and “Wasp’s Nest”. Their language is fresh and alive with poignant oft eerie imagery like “The ugly planet hangs like a mutilated moon”, “he fled through looms of leaves, fingered by spiders”, “moon-bitten, storm struck eater of stars, and dreams, it’s scream strangles the night “, “silken killer moves like water”, and “when I see you I could burst into flower”

What the owl taught me is a stirring read that captures your attention throughout. The collection is a testimony to Annest’s poetic prowess. Anyone with an interest in bestiaries, a love for wildlife and their share of environmentalist concerns would thoroughly enjoy this book.

 Wolfpack Contributor Bio: Annest Gwilym

Wolfpack Contributor Bio: Mashaal Sajid

Book Review: “Surfacing” by Annest Gwilym  (review by Mashaal Sajid)