Honorary WolfPack Members

Steve Denehan
Mela Blust
Hokis
Raine Geoghegan
Theresa Rodriguez
Robert Frede Kenter (Icefloe Press)
Damien Donnelly
Ankh Spice
Lennon Stravato
Susan Richardson
Paul Brookes
Matthew M C Smith (Black Borough Poetry)
Chris Margolin (The Poetry Question)
Norb Aikin
Catrice Greer
David Hanlon
Troy Jackson
Megha Sood
Heidi Milller Krause
Jerry Masterson
Roberto Zariskeeni /Rob Z Photography
Brett Siler/Rebore Records

Samuel Strathman
Chloe Victoria Gorman
Tianna G Hansen
Jane Rosenberg LaForge
Ron Whitehead
Geoffrey Wren
Joan Hawkins

*NO PHOTOS LISTED BUT WILL BE MENTIONED* Aaron Tanner, Austin Lucas, Paul Gilmartin, Jane Dougherty, Kara Beth Rasure, Jean Kizer, John Jones Jr, PS Pirro, Lucy Whitehead, Tony Brewer, KC Bailey, Ethan Jacob O’Nan (my brother), Nadia Gerrasimenko, Kristin Garth, Jennifer Hibbs, Lilly O’Nan (my sister), Darren Demaree (Sundress Publications) River Dixon (Potter’s Grove), Jennifer Roche, Liam Flanagan, Abdulmueed Balogun, Abuh Monday Eneojo, John Ogunlade, Jesse Falodun, David Ralph Lewis, Sidney Mansueto, Dai Fry (RIP), Samantha Merz, December Lace, Karen Mooney, Jenny Mitchell, Mukund Gnanadesikan, Julie Stevens, Gail Sheridan, Richard Waring, Ediney Santana, Vern Fein, Iona Murpy, Will Davis, Gerald Jatzek, Jason Ramsey (Barren Mag), Mike Whiting, Al Matheson, Ann Hultberg, Ceinwed CE Haydon, Merril Smith, Cara Bovaird, Chris Maxwell, Ulane Vuorio, Gaynor Kane, Ilya Kaminsky, Jack Bowman, Kaitlyn Luckow, JP Meador, Joan McNerney, Stephen Sherman, Rumillineal Poetry, Niles Reddick, Jennifer Criss, J Matthew Waters, Matt Duggan, Cee Martinez, Mike Adams, Scott Christopher Beebe, Attracta Fahy, Christina Strigas, Sarah Marquez, Xerado, Alan Parry, Paul Robert Mullen, Amanda McLeod, Ryan DeLeon, Ellen Kirkman, Matthew Calmes, Shauna McGuiness, Daniel Galef, Kimberly Cunningham, Madisn McSweeney, Greg Santos, John W Leys, Amy Barnes, Pavlina Marie, David Mellor, David Grant Lee, Jesse Lynn McMains, Amanda Reeves, Elizabeth Moura, Michelle Nadasi, Jennifer Reeves, Judge Santiago Burdon, Justin Karcher, Paul Rowe, Eric Valor (RIP), Brunette Glassco (RIP), Anna Nash, George Miller, Robin Ray, Lynn White, Jamie Routley, JDG, Pasithea Chan, David Lunn Millborn, Anne Paulet, Demi Whitnell, David Fladger, Anna Rozwadowska, Christopher Osswald, Helena Fools, CL Belcher, Barabara Avon, Ana Lorenza Jimenez, Doug Polk, Juleigh Howard-Hobson, Stephen Watt, Rachel Cunniffe, Ari Pitt, Colin James, Juliette Sebock, Hillary Behsharam, Abigail Swire, Christian Gould, Ruth Cheruto, Stephen Morgan Woodworth, Guy Farmer, Mary Jones (may soon be on team), Matt Seeley, Benjamin Adair Murphy, Sher Ting, Keely O’Shaugnessy, Tuur Verhyde, Stephen J Golds, Phil Wood, Arthur L Wood, Stephen Guenette, Shaun D Pace, Sadie Maskery, Tova Beck-Friedman, Jennifer Roche, Amanda Crum, Lisa Alletson, Doug Stuber, Amandla Med T Castro, Igor Goldkind, Nadine Vandergriff, Devika Mathur, Carrie Sword, Dunstan Carter, Andy Hunter, Kerry Darbishire, Hema Saju, J.D. Nelson, Frank Watkinson,Stu Buck, K Weber, Ken Tomaro, Gareth Culshaw, Phil Vernon, Janet Beekman, Elizabeth Castillo, Akhila Ek, Lynne Schmidt, Dave O’Leary, Matthew da Silva, Kieran Wyatt, Angelo Letizia, Patricia Walsh, Mike Hickman, Saba Zahoor, Georgia Hilton (may be contributor soon), Bradley Galimore (may be contributor soon), Mark Anthony Smith, Arun Kapur

Meet the Fevers of the Mind WolfPack Team Maggs Vibo & R.D. Johnson

A person with long hair

Description automatically generated with medium confidence Maggs Vibo

Margaret Viboolsittiseri (aka Maggs Vibo) works in print, broadcast, special events, glitch media, and online. She is a contributor for Poem Atlas and has experimental art in the winnow
magazine, Coven Poetry, Ice Floe Press, The Babel Tower Notice Board, ang(st), The Wombwell Rainbow. Recent anthologies include Poem Atlas ‘aww-struck’, Steel Incisors, Fevers of the
Mind Press Presents the Poets of 2020 (January, 2021) and ‘My teeth don’t chew on shrapnel’: an anthology of poetry by military veterans (Oxford Brookes, 2020). She tweets @maggsvibo
and her website is poemythology.com.

Visual Poetry by Maggs Vibo: Drinking the Ash Pt 1 & 2

Visual Poetry by Maggs Vibo : the Year of the Ox

R.D.J (writer, poetry, music reviews & more)

Follow R.D. Johnson on twitter @r_d_Johnson Check out his work on the Poetry Question with RDJ’s Replays https://thepoetryquestion.com/category/replay-rdj/ Read His work on dailydrunkmag.com R.D. Johnson is a pushcart nominee

https://wordpress.com/post/feversofthemind.com/2383 for poetry he posted in the past.

Meet the Fevers of the Mind WolfPack Pt 1: David L O’Nan & HilLesha O’Nan

David L O’Nan (EIC & Founder of Fevers of the Mind Poetry & Art)

Bio: David L O’Nan is a poet/writer/editor living in Western Kentucky. He is the editor along with his wife HilLesha for the Poetry and Art Anthologies and Fevers of the Mind Poetry Digest and has also edited and curated the Avalanches in Poetry: Writings and Art Inspired by Leonard Cohen. He has self-published works under the Fevers of the Mind Press & The Cartoon Diaries (2019) & New Disease Streets (2020) Taking Pictures in the Dark (2021) Lost Reflections (2021) & Our Fears in Tunnels (2021) David has had work published in Icefloe Press, Rhythm N Bones Press off-shoot Dark Marrow, Truly U, 3 Moon Magazine, Elephants Never, Royal Rose Magazine, Spillwords, Anti-Heroin Chic, Nymphs Publishing, Voices for the Cure an ALS Anthology, Ghost City Press, and has been nominated for Best of the Net. Twitter is @DavidLONan1 and @feversof for Fevers of the Mind and on Facebook at DavidLONan1

HilLesha O’Nan

Hillesha O’Nan is a blogger, writer, photographer & marketer. She is co-editor/founder of Fevers of the Mind Poetry & Art. She runs the blog tothemotherhood.com for over 15 years

Get to know musician Frank Watkinson

It was a couple of months ago that I was watching videos on youtube for Leonard Cohen, possibly Chelsea Hotel No. 2 and after the song played another version of the song began to play. It was by a man with an accoustic guitar putting his unique interpretation on the song. I dived deeper watching several of his cover songs while with my wife for a couple of hours. He wasn’t just covering folk songs. He had covers of Neutral Milk Hotel, even Slipknot, Death Cab For Cutie, Wilco, the Lumineers & more. I wondered why isn’t this guy more known. He had to have been in bands when he was younger. He has a youtube channel, just him, his guitar, his stories & the most dynamic find of all. He has wonderful original songs. He comes across very humble. He’s done hundreds of cover songs & originals for years & just loves playing music. He’s not looking for fame and money it seems. He’s doing this out of the love of making music.

https://www.youtube.com/user/LOLhi28/featured is Frank Watkinson’s youtube page. Please check his music out & his covers as well.

small interview with Frank Watkinson:

  1. First, I would like to ask how long you’ve been working on your own songs & how do you decide which songs to cover? Frank: I have been writing songs ever since I picked up a guitar, nothing any good, I still don’t think they are that great now but that’s just me , most of the covers I do are requests, I would try anything if asked ,i still do them now but the list exceeds 1500 , so the chances are getting slimmer for those that request them , I was told I should do a Patreon account and people pay for them ,but that would then seem too much like work and i also can’t cover everything ,I’d get stressed out too much ,it’s also not about the money for me I just like what I do right now.
  2. Do you enjoy writing songs more than covers?  What are some of the songs  you’re most proud of? Frank: I think i like writing my own songs because even if they are vague I know the reason I wrote it , I am not good enough a musician to play a cover exact that is why I simplify them , I have always said don’t let your inability stop you from what you enjoy ,you can only get better,
  3. Who have been your biggest influences, or musically who are some of your favorites? Frank: Basically all the older types like Dylan, James Taylor Ralph McTell , it goes on , I like almost anything acoustic ,but i also like a good song no matter what genre .
  4. Does it take you very long to write a song, and do you enjoy the process or feel hurried to get it done? Frank: Some songs take a few days on and off but they are mostly the ones where I came up with a melody first then try to put words to, others can take as little as 20 minutes for the lyrics as they seem to write themselves , then I just put a basic tune on them , it’s the ones that are started and finished in less than an hour that seem to go down the best.
  5.  I have only began listening to your stuff about a month ago, so I haven’t seen every video.  Whereabouts in the UK do  you live?  I have many great poet contributors to my poetry endeavors. It is refreshing to know it still seems relevant unlike in the U.S. as much the arts, the poetry, the music. Frank:  I live in a town called Huntingdon ,about 12 miles from Cambridge.
  6. Have you played in any bands while younger? Frank:  I have never played in a band and i haver never played live anywhere , I have no desire to either ,I’m not a stage performer I dread the thought , sitting at home with a cat and dog as my audience is one thing ,standing up in front of others is another ball game, I just mess around writing or covering a song post it on you tube and set it free , I also have no desire to record them in a studio despite the requests to, I think I’m a what you see is what you get person.
  7. Do you enjoy poetry or particular writers or authors?  I don’t mind listening to the occasional poem but I’m a terrible reader, I struggle to read a book because my mind wanders and before i know it I’ve forgotten what I’ve just read ,thank God for audio books , I can put on headphones and be in another world.
  8.  How were you encouraged to try out the youtube process, and did you use any other internet avenues prior to youtube? Frank: I put some very old songs on Soundcloud to begin with , then one day just to see how easy it was I posted a song on you tube ,easier than I thought so kept on posting , I certainly didn’t plan on the reaction i seem to be getting, I haven’t pushed myself in any way at all , it was supposed to be a bit of fun with one or two subscribers. 
  9. What have been some of your other hobbies growing up? Frank: I honestly don’t think i had any other hobbies ,I used to work almost every hour i could and the only thing I did in my spare time would have been play the guitar for an hour or two.
  10. Have you done much traveling and where are some of your favorite places you’ve visited? Frank: I have done very little travelling abroad ,a few times to Euro Disney with the family , and a visit to Cyprus to see my daughter ,but I do travel all over the UK I like to go to places then leave the main routes and discover places myself.

Just performing songs my way ,nothing too serious, we can’t all be polished professionals but that shouldn’t be a reason not to sing. if you really want to donate then here is a PayPal link ,i’m quite happy either way . https://paypal.me/pools/c/8uPISeE6aB

The Fevers of the Mind General Promo Interview with Chloe Gorman

1) Please describe your latest book, what about your book will intrigue the readers the most, and what is the theme, mood? Or If you have a blog or project please describe the concept of your project, blog, website

I’m currently working on the second series of ‘Penny Dreadfuls from the Moth Sanctuary’ – a series of free, short horror audiobooks I’m producing with my partner, Andrew Bate, and his independent theatre company, Moth Sanctuary Productions.

When lockdown hit the UK in March 2020 and production halted on the stage show we were producing, we decided to put my radio expertise, his music composition skills and our home studio set up to use and create some audiobooks. We started out by recording some lockdown themed classics, producing a version of Edgar Allan Poe’s ‘Masque of the Red Death’ and Charlotte Perkins Gilman’s ‘The Yellow Wallpaper.’

Inspired by classic Penny Dreadfuls, we then decided to create some of our own, original short horror stories, which grew into a series of ten episodes all written, recorded and produced by Andrew and I in our living room. I wrote four of the ten stories – ‘The Neighbours’ is about a woman who is driven to insanity after moving in above a mortuary; ‘The White Haired Devil’ is about a mysterious fortune teller with dark, hidden intentions; ‘Midnight Visits’ follows a young boy terrorised by a figure in the night; and ‘The Token’ is the story of an archivist who uncovers a sinister secret about the foundling hospital she is researching, inspired by a production of ‘Coram Boy’ which I starred in at Nottingham Playhouse in 2019. I also wrote an exclusive bonus episode for Thornhill Theatre Space called ‘Alice’s Shadow’ about a dark presence lurking in her room at night.

We have just started writing series two with three stories already in the making, so we hope to bring to listeners for free later in 2021.

2) How old were you when you first have become serious about your writing, do you feel your work is always adapting?

I wrote poems and songs a lot when I was a teenager, but I stopped when I was around 15 and didn’t seriously pick it up again until my late twenties. I decided to do a Masters degree in professional writing when I was 28, during which I developed a real passion for the short story format. I started writing and publishing poetry at 30.

At first, writing poetry was a therapeutic way to process my difficult emotions and work through some of the things I was experiencing at the time, so everything was quite raw and intense. Nowadays I find my poetry writing comes in waves, but my style is certainly always adapting as I try to refine my craft, while still staying true to the emotion that inspires it.

Working in the audiobook format has really helped me refine my short story writing too. I spent 10 years working in radio before I moved into publishing, so writing for the spoken word is something I am fairly adept at but I had never applied this skill to my own personal projects. Using the time I had during the first UK lockdown, I was able to dedicate myself to writing, producing five new short stories specifically for the Penny Dreadfuls from the Moth Sanctuary series, and working with artistic director Andrew Bate to bring the stories to life with his incredible voice acting and scoring.

3) What authors, poets, musicians have helped shape your work, or who do you find yourself being drawn to the most?

I find Nick Cave a source of constant inspiration, both for his staggering creativity, but also for his work ethic. I was lucky enough to see Nick Cave in Conversation in 2019, where he described how he didn’t just sit around and wait for inspiration to take over, but actively went to work at songwriting, seeing it the same way most people would see a traditional job. The idea that creativity and artistic inclination isn’t a gift bestowed on you from above, but is something that takes grit, determination and work is something that motivates me to keep creating, even when it feels fruitless. Style-wise, I find Florence Welch a big inspiration too, especially for songwriting, as I admire her rich, descriptive lyrics and often haunting, ethereal sound.

In terms of inspiration as a writer, I adore Angela Carter as I find she has the ability to totally immerse me in her fantastical worlds. I find her strong female lead characters and subversive themes delightful too. I read a lot of Bret Easton Ellis when I was a teenager which has had an undeniable influence on my writing, if not for the gritty themes, but for my soft spot for unreliable narrators. I must mention Edgar Allan Poe, I came to appreciate Poe’s work in my adult life and I truly believe he is the master of the short story, as I find his work so compelling I can devour each story in one sitting. I aspire to be able to do the same one day. More recently I am also enjoying the work of Kirsty Logan. Her short story ‘Things My Wife and I Found Hidden In Our House’ is one I find myself returning to again and again.

4) What other activities do you enjoy doing creatively, or recreationally outside of being a writer, and do you find any of these outside writing activities merge into your mind and often become parts of a poem?

As someone who writes songs, I also love to sing. I have been singing in some guise since I was around four years old. I was part of a choir that performed in a production at Nottingham Playhouse in 2019, which was a lifelong dream come true. I have been producing songs with my partner, who is also a singer-songwriter, as another lockdown project so we are hoping to release an EP sometime soon.

Outside of creative pursuits, I love to cook. I enjoy being out in nature, particularly forests and the coast. Before the pandemic I was also learning aerial hoop. I had got myself to an intermediate level but unfortunately I haven’t been able to train for nearly a year, so I am hoping to get back into that as soon as I can.

5) What is your favorite or preferred style of writing?

For poetry, I find free verse comes the most naturally to me, although I do get imposter syndrome sometimes and question whether my work is really poetry when it is so unstructured.

For fiction I am a short story writer predominantly. Although I have started work on what I hope will become a novel, the sheer volume of words required often overwhelm me. I also get an immense sense of satisfaction by being able to tell a complete story in such a short space of time so I return to that form repeatedly as I find it the most rewarding.

6) Are there any other people/environments/hometowns/vacations that has helped influence your writing?

Without wishing to sound too much of a romantic, I find my partner has genuinely inspired a lot of my poetry. I think that is largely because he encouraged me to pursue writing it and has given me such unwavering support as I have done so. I find such beauty in the complexity of human relationships – love, desire, loss, even the everyday experiences – that writing inspired by him and our relationship is often what comes naturally to me.

For my fiction writing, a lot of that comes from the dark recesses of my own mind. One story in particular was inspired by a memory I had as a child. When I was around four years old, I was convinced that I had seen a ghost sitting at the end of my bed. For years I thought it was an old woman, for some reason or another, and I ended up converting this memory into a horror story called ‘Midnight Visits’ which we put out as one of the Penny Dreadfuls from the Moth Sanctuary series. After telling my parents this over dinner one evening, my dad revealed to me that just a few days after his father died, when I was four years old, he and my mother had heard me talking to someone in the middle of the night. When they came into my room, my dad said he could smell my grandfather’s aftershave and there was an indentation on the end of my bed as though someone had been sat there. He had never told me that story before, so I still get goosebumps just thinking about it!

7) What is the most rewarding part of the writing process, and in turn the most frustrating part of the writing process?

For me, starting is the most frustrating point. All too often I will find an excuse not to start writing at all, which usually comes from self-consciousness or fear. I then get frustrated with myself because I want to be writing and creating something. So I have to force my way through the blocks I put in my own path before ultimately enjoying the creative process once it starts.

The most rewarding part I find is editing. I work as a deputy editor for my day job, so I spend a good amount of time sub editing other people’s work, which to me feels like polishing something to get it to its absolute best state. For me, I love it when someone reads my story for the first time and tells me their interpretation – what they think is happening, who they think the characters are, if any parts don’t ring true or cause them to lose the immersion in the story. Going back through and refining, polishing and improving those things always gives me a real sense of satisfaction, as it feels like I’m investing in my own work and increasing its value. When someone has invested their own time in reading or listening to one of my stories, I want to make sure that experience is the best it can possibly be.

8) How has the current times affected your work?  
I feel very privileged that although the pandemic presented several challenges for me, both personally and financially, it also presented me with the time and opportunity to really invest in my own personal work, which is something I hadn’t really had before.

If I hadn’t had the extra time lockdown afforded me, I doubt I would have actually pursued the idea of creating a series of original audiobooks, so I am both proud and grateful to have had the chance to do that.
It’s also been wonderful to be more involved with my partner’s theatre company. I got to work with him to produce an exclusive, live streamed performance for Cheltenham Literature Festival and have had the opportunity to take on my first performing role, as we acquired a temporary license to perform Angela Carter’s ‘The Company of Wolves’ as a free online video.

I am exceptionally lucky that, despite a very sad death in my family due to Covid recently, lockdown has given me the space and the time to be creative in a way that I never have before.

9) Please give us any links, social media info, upcoming events, etc for your work.

You can find the Penny Dreadfuls from the Moth Sanctuary series for free on Youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d4DIVULDVWQ&list=PL9RxMiCupesJ9Y_IpdDOWZ6UZMC_R-61b alongside some of our other work, including our Poe inspired ‘Deep in Earth’ performance for the 2020 Cheltenham Literature Festival and an exclusive reading of Angela Carter’s ‘The Company of Wolves.’

The Penny Dreadfuls series is also available on Spotify, Apple Podcasts and Podbean.

You can follow me on Twitter @chloevwrites, Instagram @chloevictoriawrites and on Facebook.com/chloevictoriawrites

Chloe GormanWriter, poet, copywriter, voiceover

Read my work at www.chloevictoriawrites.com twitter.com/chloevwrites

instagram.com/chloevictoriawrites