the Fevers of the Mind General Interview with Abuh Monday Eneojo

1) Please describe your latest book, what about your book will intrigue the readers the most, and what is the theme, mood? Or If you have a blog or project please describe the concept of your project, blog, website

Abuh Monday: My latest book is Piary . It was published in 2019 in Ibadan, a city in Nigeria known for it’s aged lifestyle
and beautiful rooftops. Intrigue? Hmmmm…it is a poetic diary. Who doesn’t want to take a peek at ones
diary?

2) What frame of mind and ideas lead to you writing your current book?

Abuh Monday: Basically, Piary , is an anthology of poems that houses the mind blowing experience of poet who tries not
sell his humanity to feminism, sexism, culture, lewdness and a whole lot of things you may want to tag
as frivolous in the society. As a way of spicing up the art of reading and understanding poetry, I gave
explanatory notes for some poems in the anthology.

3) How old were you when you first have become serious about your writing, do you feel your work is always adapting?

Abuh Monday: I really do not know. Sometimes I feel it was the need to hold on to a strong resolve which keeps me
from frivolity but most times, it all comes down to the one who created me. I feel him greatly inspiring. 12 years old, i guess. Yes! It is adapting.me to write, then, I write.

4) What authors, poets, musicians have helped shape your work, or who do you find yourself being drawn to the most?

Abuh Monday: William Shakespeare, Bob Marley, Asa, Buju Banton, Stormzy, Chinua Achebe, Festus Iyayi, Frederick
Forsyth etc The list is quite long but these are the people who inspire me when I write.

5) What other activities do you enjoy doing creatively, or recreationally outside of being a writer, and do you find any of these outside writing activities merge into your mind and often become parts of a poem?

Abuh Monday: Emmm… Podcasting, Singing, and Video/Sound editing. Yes.

6) What is your favorite or preferred style of writing?

Abuh Monday: For that I have no preference. Style to me is based on how I feel. I may end up using a free verse today
and end up with a sonnet or series of couplets with rhyme scheme.

7) Are there any other people/environments/hometowns/vacations that has helped influence your writing?

Abuh Monday: Yes. For each place( city, town or village) that I visit in Nigeria I write. The place that influenced my
writing mostly is Daily Wisdom Words. An online writing community I joined some years ago.

8) What is the most rewarding part of the writing process, and in turn the most frustrating part of the writing process?

Abuh Monday: The most rewarding part of writing is getting thoughts out on paper and the frustrating part of it all is
inability to get it out. It is damn frustrating.

9) How has the current times affected your work?  

Abuh Monday: Not so badly, if I must be sincere. It may have limited or changed the focus of humans but all we can do
is try.

10) Please give us any links, social media info, upcoming events, etc for your work.

Abuh Monday: Yes. You can read my articles on Daily Wisdom Words and listen to my podcast on poetry on
soundcloud . I am working on my first novel. Three more chapters to go and it’ll be sent for proof reading.
Find Abuh Monday on Instagram & Twitter at MondayDPoet

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the FOTM Poetry General Interview with Simon Zec

1) Please describe your latest book, what about your book will intrigue the readers the most, and what is the theme, mood? Or If you have a blog or project please describe the concept of your project, blog, website


Simon: In The Downtime is my second poetry collection, released two years after Death of the Suburb, in September 2020. It is a selection of poems written during that period. Whereas my first collection was an amalgam of all previous writings, reflecting Brexit, austerity , political turmoil, becoming a parent, living and loving but also the death of my mother, this collection travels a less angry path. The decline of my slowly dementing and widowed father and the conflict and emotions that brings as I reflect at my own role as a father. The imminent upheaval of Brexit and then the start of a pandemic. It looks at the thoughts and musings of a middle aged, middle class, middle of the road poet.


2) What frame of mind and ideas lead to you writing your current book?


Simon: I write for therapy. To help me process the world around me. To see the world and try and put into a short, resonating collection of words. I spit my poems after they have bubbled around my head for a few days. Maybe I have seen a thing of beauty, or a nice phrase has popped into my head. I see it, I write it, it is released into the wild.


3) How old were you when you first have become serious about your writing, do you feel your work is always adapting?


Simon: I have always tried to be a writer, from failed novels, failed film scripts to less failed poetry. Now I am older I feel I have enough self realisation to recognise the merits or foolishness of my words. But ask me in five years, I’ll see how pretentious I am being now.

4) What authors, poets, musicians have helped shape your work, or who do you find yourself being drawn to the most?


Simon: Henry Normal is a brilliant poet, his work can have you laughing out loud to in tears within two poems. Brian Bilston is a black belt in poetry, his clever use of form and structure combined with humour is so impressive. He has become a more political creature in lockdown and still maintaining his wit. Within my local poetry circle in Sussex i know and perform regularly with a real diverse bunch of great poets, from Liam the Goth Poet, Meg, Kate, Maz and Liz and Chris. We meet monthly (on zoom nowadays) and to be in their presence inspires to write something new and keeps me on my toes


5) What other activities do you enjoy doing creatively, or recreationally outside of being a writer, and do you find any of these outside writing activities merge into your mind and often become parts of a poem?


Simon: Before lockdown myself and 4 friends would meet each week to create music. They are a talented bunch of musicians and we keep trying to create new music. Hanging with them frees up my chance to write lyrics and stick to a structure, form, rhyme and rhythm which i do not possess in my poetry


6) What is your favorite or preferred style of writing?

Simon: I have no real defined or clear poetry style, it has been pointed out that there is always some form of repetition within my poems, but apart from that I very rarely rhyme. I do not work to structure or form.

7) Are there any other people/environments/hometowns/vacations that has helped influence your writing?


Simon: The world around me is my inspiration. Be it my family, the political situation, the environmentI find if i am away from home, on holiday or just sitting quietly i can be my most creative. My friends own a remote cottage in somerset with no electricity. If i could live there i would happily sit and write for the rest of my life

8) What is the most rewarding part of the writing process, and in turn the most frustrating part of the writing process?


Simon: I find writing highly therapeutic. If i am upset or need to process any issues, writing it out and putting it in a poem often will ease the situation tenfold. I hate the editing process. Having to check for spelling mistakes and punctuating something is very tedious!

9) How has the current times affected your work?  


Simon: Hugely during the first lockdown i was creating daily. As time wore on i preferred to write less but of a higher quality. In the dark times is where we find the inspiration and in the downtime between the bad bits are where we find solace. As the world struggles they turn to poets and creatives to help them understand what is happening. It is our responsibility to show the light and offer hope and beauty.

10) Please give us any links, social media info, upcoming events, etc for your work.


Simon: You can find me on Facebook as Simon Zec: Steyning’s Poet Laureate or just find me as Simon Zec i’m more active as myself! Twitter at: @SimonZec23 Insta: @SimonZecPoet
I don’t have a website but you can buy my books from http://www.therealpress.co.uk or amazon

Spotlight on the Poetry Question & Chris Margolin

If you’re a poet or writer, you need exposure.  Especially, if you’re an independent writer, or work or run a small press.  Luckily, for us, there is a website that has been expanding exponentially the last few years giving us more exposure to the best independent poets and writers out there today.   The Poetry Question provides the concept of asking “How will you Poetry today?”  The man behind the beginnings of the Poetry Question is Chris Margolin.

He shares a passion for visualizing the future of poetry and giving a voice to poets.  Whether it would be the unique interview in which you answer the poetry questions on influences, favorite books, authors, influences.  Detailed info on why these works or writers have deemed such an influence on a writer. The site has been excellent and expanding their team on reviewing Poetry Chapbooks and novels & novellas.  

Within the last year, Chris has worked hard on adding a small press to give another avenue for writers to put out chapbooks.    So, with that introduction, we shall ask a few questions to Chris Margolin of “the Poetry Question”   http://thepoetryquestion.com

Hi Chris, thanks for giving us at Fevers of the Mind the opportunity to learn more about The Poetry Question and the exciting future of the site.

Thank you for having me! I’m a fan of Fevers of the Mind, so this is an exciting opportunity for me. I’m honored.

  1.  First off Chris, when did you come up with the idea of the Poetry Question? The original concept?  When was the moment that hit you and said “Hey I need to help small press poets and self-published poets”?

I’ve written a lot about the foundation of The Poetry Question, but I appreciate that your question focuses on Small Press Poetry and Self-Published Poetry. The site went through so many different iterations. It was an educational site – I’ve taught for almost 20 years – in the early days. Then it was a music review site. Then it was a general book review site. Then I started going to The Portland Poetry Slam in Portland, Oregon. My first night there was like finding a new religion. My introduction couldn’t have been more epic: Clementine von Radics, Alex Dang, Brenna Twohey, and the legendary Andrea Gibson. I bought every book on the table that night. That was it. These were stapled together like the zines I used to buy in high school. They were beautiful. And they needed to be seen. There wasn’t much of a choice at that point. Voices needed to be heard, and I couldn’t find a website that focused solely on small press or self-published poetry. So, it seemed like the obvious choice and direction.

  •  I know that you have decided to put out a few chapbooks, how has that experience been like that for you? What about going into the Press business has been rewarding, and what has been more challenging?

This is one of the most rewarding, important, and scary accomplishments in my life. I have no idea what I’m doing. I’ve always just been on the review side of things. I had dreamt about putting out other people’s poetry, but never thought it made sense until last year. Our daily readership went up faster than I could have ever imagined, and it just felt right. Holding a submission period, and knowing that people – without the use of Submittable – were actually sending me their words was jaw-dropping. I never expected to get submissions. I had over 75 in a month. It was such a validation of what I’d been working toward, and so humbling to know that so many would trust us with their manuscripts. We are just a few weeks from the release date (Jan 15) for both Jennifer Roche and Van G. Garrett’s respective books, The Synonym Tables, and SCRAP. They have been so kind as I stumble through this process. Can’t wait to see what happens!          

  •  I’d like to know more about the Power of Poetry section of the site. What about this section really has been a huge help with especially younger writers to understand how to be an effective writer, and how you can work at your craft to expand even when it seems the writing world is against you?

Isn’t the writing world always against us? Look, the reality is that we a lot of us started as bedroom poets and writers. We wrote middle school novels and song lyrics and poetry and tried to either hide it from everyone or share it with the world. But those words meant everything to us. They were our therapy. Fortunately, it is still our therapy. But that looks so different for everyone, and I wanted to hear their stories. I wanted everyone to hear their stories. I don’t really know if there’s an “effective writer.” I think there is an effectiveness in everything we put down on paper. It might not resonate with everyone, but it may change someone’s life.

  •  This has been a challenging year for everyone, and I’m sure for you this hasn’t been an exception. During such a year of darkness, where have you found the small beams of light that has given you a creative uplift for your ideas with TPQ?

This is a softball question. I sign into my twitter account every day, and I get to read the works of hundreds of poets each week. I get to ask “How will you Poetry today” and hope that maybe that will remind someone to write or submit or edit or read or share or whatever they can do to spread the word of Small Press Poetry. I get to be the bullhorn for poets who might not have an outlet to share their work. That’s one hell of a beam of light.

  •  Please give us more info on how to reach your site, your social media, what one needs to do to submit to the Poetry Question for a review of their new book & more. Also, when do you expect your first chapbooks to be released, any hints on what to expect from these?

Everyone can find us at thepoetryquestion.com. If you’re interested in submitting a book for review, there is a link provided on the site. We don’t get through everything that comes our way, but we work hard to review all that we can. The first two chapbooks will be released on January 15th, 2021. Jennifer Roche’s The Synonym Tables tackles the changing of language over the last 75 years. With a deep focus on our current world issues, this one feels more poignant now more than ever. Van G. Garrett’s SCRAP takes you round by round through perseverance and the art of survival. He is a legend, and I am blown away that he was ever interested in submitting to TPQ.

  • Any shout outs you’d like to give to any poets, small press, co-workers with TPQ?

This is a tricky one for me as there are so many poets and presses I’d love to shout out. Here are a few poets to keep in your sights: Chris Butler, Taylor Byas, Beth Gordon, Danielle Rose, and Jason Crawford are all beyond inspiring right now.

Chris Margolin is the founder and EiC of The Poetry Question, the only site in the world to focus solely on small press and self-published poetry reviews. Beyond his work in poetry he has taught high school and middle school English for almost 20 years. He lives in Vancouver,Washington with his wife, daughter, two dogs, and seven chickens

Fevers of the Mind Poetry Blog

 

 So here is the deal with the future of Fevers of the Mind blog. We will be semi-retiring mostly from new submissions. I will post poetry from the Anthologies and my work as well mostly. I want to focus on writing for fun again.

I have major general anxiety, adhd, depression, and RSD and I love helping out other poets, but I want to find joy in writing again and less focus on trying the editor game. I want to focus on being the best father, husband, writer when it feels right. Thanks   – David L O’Nan

*On our blog we will put up content from our Anthologies and books. This content will come and go periodically when space is needed*  

Follow me on Twitter @DavidLONan1 and Fevers of the Mind  @feversof  and on Facebook: DavidLONan1

For More go to Amazon and look for the Fevers of the Mind Press Presents the Poets of 2020 Deluxe Edition paperback & kindle  Split editions Volumes 1 & 2 from the Deluxe edition available on paperback (look for post on Fevers of the Mind Press Presents the Poets of 2020 to know who are contributors in each book), Fevers of the Mind Poetry Digest Volumes 1-3 available on paperback and kindle. Also there is a Poetry Only combination book of Volumes 1 & 2:  Avalanches in Poetry: Writings & Art Inspired by Leonard Cohen available on Paperback & Kindle.   My poetry books (David L O’Nan) New Disease Streets (November 2020) The Cartoon Diaries (2019) Taking Pictures in the Dark (February 2021) also available on Amazon.  For my Amazon Author Page (may not have all listed at first)  I have had work published in Icefloe Press, Royal Rose Magazine, Truly U, Dark Marrow an offshoot of Rhythm & Bones Lit, Ghost City,  3 Moon Publishing, Elephants Never, Nymphs Publishing, Heroin-Chic & more. I have edited 5 Anthology editions & have poetry, prose, short stories, photography in Fevers of the Mind Poetry (&Art) Digest/Avalanches in Poetry Writings & Art Inspired by Leonard Cohen.  A Best of the Net Nominee for 2021.

An Interview with Brett Siler of Rebore Records in Fevers of the Mind Poetry Digest Issue 2

Q1: When did you first learn that you had a love, niche for music? What was your first favorite style of music (NKOTB obviously)? When did you get your first guitar?

“For niche music I would say when I became a teenager. I got into BMX and would buy BMX videos and the soundtracks to them would be a lot underground music, mostly punk rock. I just went down the rabbit hole from there. I made friends in with people in high school that also liked punk and we started going to pretty much any local show we could; most of which consisted of punk, hardcore and metal. I later got into lots of other styles of music but that was where it began. My first favorite style of music when I was a little kid was probably classical. I loved Tchaikovsky, particularly Swan Lake and The Nutcracker. As a teenage when I would say punk rock had a life altering impact, particularly Black Flag. I got my first guitar when I was in 3rd grade but I didn’t really have to focus you need to learn an instrument then (what 3rd grader does?). I’d much rather play with Ninja Turtles at that age. I later started playing guitar more obsessively at 13.

Q2: What made you lean towards learning production, engineering side of music? Was it out of necessity, or did you study/learn from others?
initially when I was a young teenager I just wanted to record my own music. I recorded my first bands album on a cassette tape answering machine. I later got a cassette 4 track as a teenager which I recorded the Sludgephone album on (Rebore’s first release). When I was 18 I had the classic ultimatum of going college or get kicked out. A nearby college had Audio Engineering as a major. That sounded less scary than being homeless. So I went school for that. I used the loan money to buy recording equipment. I also figured if I was charging money to record people I should get good at it so I started obsessively studying it. Recording my own band for free was also a big motivation.. I mostly learned from just doing it first hand, and reading books and internet forums; more so than college. I eventually dropped out of college and just pursued recording on my own. So It was a little of both out of necessity and learning from others, and just trial and error.

Q3: I have most of the Stationary Odyssey stuff, and fascinated by the strange visuals in the videos. Who came up with the strange visuals such as Zombie-Santas and such in the video “My Baby is Black”

I believe that was our friend Shawn Knight’s idea. He in an amazing band called Child Bite (as well as a few other rad projects coming out). He also released the very first Stationary Odyssey album on a label he ran called Boy Arm Records. Super talented dude!

Q4: Tell me about Rebore Records. When did you first establish the label. Discuss some of the artists who have recorded under your label. I guess this isn’t much of a question, as it is giving you the soapbox on your label

Rebore Records was established in December of 2013. I was doing a similar thing called Dyspepsidisc with Aaron Tanner previously but that dissolved and I started Rebore up with my buddy Nick Schenk. It’s a home for my friends and my recordings. Luckily my friends are super talented! There’s no real theme genre wise for the label. I trust and respect my friends as people and artists. I just want to help them and be supportive.

Q5: I know you have also done some acting in movies, have you explored doing more acting, or do you see yourself as more of a musician than an actor? What do you enjoy doing more

That all came about after befriending Mitch Massie. We had similar taste in movies (both of our favorite movie is Gummo) and he was very supportive of my bands I was in at the time of meeting him, Gratis and Stationary Odyssey. He asked if I want to be in a movie he was making called The Anathema Report (the soundtrack is released on Rebore and is one of my favorite releases on there). That started a 10 year relationship of acting in 3 full length movies and somewhere around 60 music videos he made! He is extremely talented and hope to work more with him. Plus, he is one of the funniest people I’ve ever met. I worked on a few other peoples things here and there but 95%
has been with Mitch. I’ll be in something my friend Zach Zint is making starting this weekend. I mostly see myself as a musician, but I do think I started getting good at acting after doing so many videos. As far as what I enjoy more…I just enjoy creating in general and being apart of things that I cool so I enjoy both.

Q6: I know you are more into the music side of songs & musicians. I know that you are a big punk, metal, alternative rock fan. However, being this is also a Poetry & Art Magazine, what are some of your favorite lyricists or lyrics? Is any Fugazi related?

Fugazi has amazing lyrics! I think Tom Waits is a great lyricist. Dennis Lyxzen lyrics off of Refused “Shape of Punk to Come” are excellent. Jello Biafra’s work in Dead Kennedy’s and LARD. Dimtri Minakais and Ben Weinman’s lyrics on Dillinger Escape Plan’s “Calculating Infinity”. I’ll give examples of lines that I really like by each artist. Fugazi: “You hear something outside? It sounds like a gun Stay away from that window, boy It’s not anyone that we know Only about ourselves and What we read in the paper Don’t you know ink washes out Easier than blood?”

Tom Waits “T’aint no sin to take off your skin and dance around in your bones” (William S Burroughs song that song, not sure if he wrote those lyrics or if Tom Waits did.. Burroughs rules)

Refused: “I got a bone to pick with capitalism and a few to break Grab us by the throat and shake the life away Human life is not commodity, figures, statistics or make believe”

The Locust “Is this the dumpster of your dreams?”

Jello Biafra “Peeling back the foreskin of liberty”

Dillinger Escape Plan “Alfresco slapsticked Foam mouth sunshine”
Q7: How do we get out of Evansville? Let me word this differently. Evansville, Indiana hasn’t always been known to have a huge art, music & poetry scene. What can small cities such as Evansville do to be more proactive in creating opportunities for bands, poets, art in whole? It always seems once we have a decent venue for music or poetry then it disappears rather quickly.

That is a big and hard question. I think one thing that is stacked against Evansville and cities like it is, it is economically depressed. Most people here don’t have very much money and are usually working some shit job. Music and art programs are usually the first to be stripped from schools, so there isn’t much education on music, art, poetry; so, there are going to be less people interested in it. Evansville is also very isolated. Culturally there isn’t much emphasis on being creative. It’s mostly focused family, Christianity, work. The reason a venue disappears rather quickly is because it gets crushed by the economic realities, we all have to deal with. I think without the material infrastructure to cover even just basic needs it is very difficult for there to be a sustained art scene.

Q8: Tell me about Plasticizer. How did this idea come up? Was it to see how fast you can bang out a good song? Plasticizer came up because all the bands I were in ended. I just started writing music own my own under that name. I was trying to impose a short time frame to finish a song at first just so I didn’t sit on the project forever. I hit a huge wall with that band because of a string of severe bad luck pretty much put everything to a halt. I was evicted out of my studio and living space then quickly moved into a place that caught fire and destroyed everything I own. I’ve spent the last three years working so I can get back to creating again. It’s been very hard. I hope to be able to get back to it very soon.

Q9: Everyone should listen to the Halloween Special from Rebore Records. Tell people how you can order music, your website, social medias, all the Brett Siler and Rebore Records people need to know. I agree everyone should listen to it! You can currently order our music from https://rebore.bandcamp.com/ , we are also the bigger social media site, Facebook, Instagram, Twitter, Youtube Even better is if you sign up to our email list! ReboreRecords@gmail.com!

Q10: Are there any big projects you are currently working on, or just completed? Is there any colleague’s work you would like to promote? I’m currently working on finishing up a movie score that I am very happy with so far! Should be done with that very soon. After that I would mostly like to focus on Plasticizer,but I have a million side projects sitting on my hard drive, that I’ve collaborated with friends. Also have some albums from older bands I was in that are finally going to be released!

Q11: Talk about the music they play late in the Meijer. I know you have strong opinions on the Shania Twain, Edwin McCain, some current goof pop, or maybe out of nowhere you’ll hear that strange Benny Mardones song. Why is there no “My War” by Black Flag?

HA! One of the funniest/cringier song I heard there was some Reel Big Fish. I feel like people would get to amped hearing My War and trash the store and steal all the groceries.

Q12: Any writing contribution for this edition? Perhaps your own Canterbury Tale or such? *crickets chirping* I’m gonna write the Nu Bible

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