A Book Review of Doctor Lazarus by David Hay . A Review by Maid Corbic

“David Hay Doctor Lazarus” (Alien Buddha Press) is the dark side of poetry that the author decides to create because he hopes for some maybe better times or worse, because there is no solution for this world anymore. And so he goes through all the states of this world and believes that one day he will leave everything behind, but he must always be disappointed in everything that surrounds him. He always clearly leaves his actions to the people around him to try to interpret everything he says. But it always makes it clear that this world is very black and that we have to say goodbye to some things, believe in what is written to us and sometimes do not trust some people around us because it always leads us to lies and problems This collection offers us many answers to some things from reality, but also to the people themselves who can always explain to us some events to which we have become very blind and lazy over time and years. to see through the shaft of our destiny what in no way gives us nights of peace.

Divided into selections themselves, each captor tells us about people who were a thing of the past in our lives as well as that love is always present in ourselves and not in some objects. Every story must have its consistency, just like this one, which always speaks to some things clearly and loudly, alluding to memories that times must suffer unnecessarily. The real value of this collection are the beautiful arranged lines that are written in free verses and forms. His goal is to always portray some dreams in two dimensions of the world, because the third does not exist. The author clearly distances himself from anything that has become so nothing and almost insignificant to him, but he believes in hope. Although he writes black things, he believes that the world must be colorful and bright, not just black, even though he writes about it. It means that he is going through the cataclysms of time and that only he as such knows some solutions from our story that have become strange in nature. The hectic world and unequal rules lead to the fact that each of his presentations is repeated by the previous chapter with meaning, clearly speaking about the parts that bother him the most, paranoia, stress, anger, fear, hunger … And the sacred has its own, because such is the real world he portrays him, his works are very clear and especially interwoven, because he lives for dreams that always give him an account of reality.

The objects he adorns and describes are once supernatural, but he always speaks in his face; yes. And in some works he also talks about the problems that indirectly make it even harder for us authors to hide, because he wants us to understand what it’s like to be in someone’s skin that is not completely skin, but not quite human. pale because there is no reason for us to create something better by the existence of nature if we know that it is just a fictitious lie from which we cannot get away so easily. And of course we live with the idea of ​​this collection, because it is impossible to escape from anything that accompanies us directly or indirectly, and it is simply a life that gives us a lot to say and that we must always be clear and loud when performing our equals. the rules and rights of speech that we have are clearly engraved in our wonderful hearts that beat fast and do not allow to disappear so easily without any body language and dreamy soul that must live and survive. He also talks here about the cities that I would like to visit one day, to live in them and, in the end, maybe to realize all his dreams there, which he still sees in a pessimistic way. All his depictions are experienced somehow in those states of the soul that he tries to gladly resist, but he doesn’t know any way to get closer to everything that bothers and oppresses him all his life.

His ideological solution is for this world to be more sustainable and for everything we do to be only for this world. The author also talks about selling himself for one express train to Britain where he sat alone, he didn’t have anyone to share the happiness as much as he wanted to share the problems, but again somehow, he was just one doctor Lazarus of his dreams who wanted to possesses in the bottom of the soul. He lived for some happier and better times, which in the end partially came true for him. His epilogue is to be still alive and enduring with the time of his existence and to look forward to some times, some events and coexistences of nature that he may have needed in the end as well.

This work of over seventy-one pages can still be read indefinitely because each chapter opens the page to the previous one and gives an epilogue to the events of free form imbued with poems and stories from his angle that were strange but persistent, as well as clear and loud. The times that agree are now becoming very important because everything that works and dreams and wants to come true is just a story from the past that is gradually opened to him, he must be what he is and is not. He lived for the time given to him, he dreamed of reaching his goal, and whether he came or not, the authors must find out. This work is very psychologically apologetic and it takes a little time for the authors, especially new ones, to get used to it, but of course it is not a problem for all those people who like to create and believe that they will understand this. We can say that the challenge was to read this accordingly that his works are very difficult to understand, but that through the captures everything is later clear where it is clearly numbered at the end of each chapter and finely edited in this PDF book, and certainly in libraries around the world . Fleeing from ourselves as a lesson we flee from everything around us and this is sometimes so little unnecessary because we have to look at the world as if it is equal and that in fact it is, after all, only large in color and size surrounded.

Wolfpack Contributor Bio: Maid Corbic

A Review from “Thank You For the Content III” by R.D. Johnson (Reggie D. Johnson)

This is a quick chapbook by Reggie D. Johnson.
But in 20 pages Reggie is full of reflection.
Reggie is full of fear, full of strength, full of freedom, full of rejection.  
To feel completion when sitting with bravery.
It is a year of overcoming.  While the clock may still be ticking negatively in the now.  Maybe, just maybe there is a unity in time, in people, in change. Towards impermanence.  The lyrical poems in this chapbook is the ultimate in a thinking man's poetry.  Real poetry, not based in fiction, a storytelling from truth not from a new found religion.  
The errors and failures of government, the death of heroes when people became "SCARED" and their hidden prejudices out for display.  Reggie perfectly preaches out the rhythm of covid-era poetry and holding up a mirror to the world to see the reflection of all the sacrifices that have been given.   The blood that has been shed should make us stronger, even as the ills in the air suffocates not only our breath, but clogs the clarity in our minds.   The years even in it's most "radical" to many still seems to be a still frame that doesn't fade easily.  Just remains gray. But the hope has to be vocalized, because WE have to recognize that WE are the ones that can change the direction of the compass.   Let's change the compass and head to the right direction. Finally.

This chapbook has so many thought provoking poems including (Not Just on) Juneteenth published on this blog, soon to be in a Fevers of the Mind Anthology and also a Best of the Net Nominee.
I applaud Reggie D. Johnson for putting out poetry that matters more than just a self-righteous glorification.    

Here is a link to the chapbook through Daily Drunk Magazine. 
https://t.co/VePilY3a9w?amp=1   @dailydrunkmag 

Fevers of the Mind Quick-9 Interview with Reggie D. Johnson (aka R.D. Johnson)

Poetry by R.D. Johnson : (Not Just On) Juneteenth

Poem by R.D. Johnson: “Just a Scratch” (new poetry)

4 Poems by R.D. Johnson : Malcolm & Martin, Angels, Dr. King’s Dream & February 1st (re-post)

#StopTheHate Poetry Challenge for Social Justice, Injustice Poetry, Essays, Rants & Unity

Book Review for Jeff Parent ‘This Bygone Route’ review by Maid Corbic

https://www.thetemzreview.com/store/p18/This_Bygone_Route_by_Jeff_Parent.html

to purchase book or learn more click link above

Jeff Parent @yuppoems on Twitter

“This Bygone Route” is one wonderful book collection that continues to conquer the entire world. In each poem we can find knowledge of the world and of what we may present ourselves today; his words are still very large and steady no matter what else they say. Struggling with himself and his ego, he continues to revive his deeds in beautiful deeds that are instructive to all of us, not just him. Many of these poems that I have read are very important, so they talk about life, the real state of man and emotions that are trivial, equally persistent, and they can always tell us about life that is equal. Of course, everything we experience is just one real situation that we have to overcome with courage and equality, and this collection of books shows us just that.

A special stylistic text describes all the poems I have read and are metrically very accurate. It is very difficult to see that today. This collection is also very wonderful as it also has many lyrical images; describes nature, a man who always tries to fight what is still stable and flat for him, with human epithets and times that are bad for him. His stage of life as well as his thinking itself gradually changes when he realizes that he can no longer hold on to equality and words that continued to become harder and harder for him. A collection that always gives selectness, is always concisely worded every one of his works that carries multiple messages; the struggle for rights, unrequited love or those conditions that we have to worry about, mentally where many today no longer care about it and create dangerous barriers. Every goal must also justify the means, because only in this way can we declare a story to be realistic and enduring. Not otherwise.


The struggle is present and the passion for a man to wake up from some daydreams like a phoenix and to rise far regardless of the events around him. The name of the collection itself can carry a lot of forty-one poems, each of which is fantastic in its own way, and each of them shows an explicit desire and opportunity to progress in this world that has continued to become unsettled. Times change and life slowly begins to get harder and harder, but the author does not give up so easily either; he reciprocates his energies in each poem and proves that the world around him is still dignified and colorful, and that in the end he has reason to live another year in happiness and peace, and not just be one sad black bird that has to fly from one end. on the other. He still carried sin in some poems, but that does not mean that he is a sinner. On the contrary, he is a very strong man who shows time and direction in every poem, a direction he deserves to proudly carry in the depths of his woven soul, because he values around himself the best deeds and works that other people bring him.

Of all the poems, “Eclipse Year” is the most realistic because it is about the author himself who is trying to find his peace in his world and to live some of his unfulfilled dreams, because he wanted to be still alive; only he felt he was trapped between two lines and no longer had a reason to live some of his cherished dreams. But on the contrary, he believed, as in many poems, that God is only one and that everything he creates is really just his thought that made him think of others maybe some bad things and maybe he did not dream or want that. He believed that there must be a story behind every corner that would lead him to some small details that would eventually lead to even bigger ones, but he thought that time did best. This is what the narrative of the poem itself says, the year of the turning point and the environment in which he finds himself, and it is time to finally dedicate himself and realize all his dreams until he finally becomes an old man and where he will still not be able to work and dream all his dreams. the desires he dreamed; because his reality was still on shaky ground. The year of cataclysm, to put it mildly, this poems says that we still have to be strong and look forward as always, not to think black things because that’s the only way those that we don’t want to see and feel can happen to us, because the worst defeat is when we declare without any warning beforehand. Year after year, some things will improve. Nothing will ever stay so dark and that justice must always win in the end.

“Coming home” means one part of the song in which the author sets himself in plans and wishes, but he slowly realizes it. He lives in an ideal world where nothing is equal to him, but he is afraid of being so doomed in that reality, because he must value himself first and foremost and ultimately be the leader of his dreams that he realizes. He wanted everything he did to be only in his mind and that one day if he was lucky and accomplished. This poem is thoughtful, but of course it takes on great significance because the lack of the figure of an important person still leaves a trace of the great in the heart that cannot be healed so easily, as for example his father when he loved very much and I would give anything for him. Nothing happened just so by accident and he had to believe that between waking and dreaming there is only one wish and thought, and that is a better and more beautiful world that awaits him one day when he disappears. The belief is that the world is one steam engine that leads to the end and that revision is always just his life, which no longer makes sense because of a very important figure. Some things cannot be repeated together as before.


“Humidex” is also a great poem that says that the title is first and foremost very special and that it fits in brilliantly about these happenings, is the self-awareness it holds. Psychologically speaking, metrically correct. Many competitions can achieve exceptional work, but of course its message is numerous, which the author must eventually find a solution on his own and be guided by thoughts that have become very difficult for him, because the song itself requires a lot of concentration. But far from true, of course this is a poem that has emotions and style in it, it has colors and comparisons even.

I was especially impressed by the fact that it is very nicely decorated in a visual sense; from margins to padding, to numbering, and from poems to lyrical images to metaphors – in one place everything can be found very easily and in an assistant. All the titles of the poems are very ingenious and creative, each author can find inspiration for some future works that he will have and that in the end he creates something that no one else could, and that is diversity.

With forty-one pages, forty-one possible visions of the world, I still have a strong impression after reading, so it is true that this book may be extremely incomprehensible for beginners, but for professionals it is very clear and helpful.


“Acid Rain Day” is a poem that is presented in the most beautiful light. It is one of the long poems that are free forms, as well as many poems that you will read here of course with great joy, it is wonderful when that love is still cultivated sincere and pure, which is drinkable according to the times to come, nature and culture of living on which we observe “for granted”. Much is offered here, from family values to encouragement in every desire, for yet the courage today is that anything can be done, and be warted to ruin. It all makes you laugh when you are a parent who puts herself in her roots and supports the virgin, not to cry and be happy when she lives her true dream that must come true anyway. It is the poem that talks about parenthood, courage and the very culture of living, the epilogue of the event is all the memories of the window that are watched in silence.

It is important to say that everything is very nicely packaged, from the composition of the parents to the black bird that flies silently in songs, sometimes a happy epilogue and sometimes sad give a psychological meaning to a person to develop his writing and focus on a reality that never she was no closer. After reading this you can be very proud of yourself, because it is wonderful at the end of each work to realize that there are some emotions that you also live, that we all live. That is why the poems serve us, as well as Acid Rain Day to show that there is joy between every sorrow, even though it is the window of the observer’s eye, it depends on the time we live in, so it will be for us. And I, I tell you to read this book and to happily share your advice with everyone around you, because only in this way can some things be experienced and be as wonderful and fabulous as ever. In the end, the message of this book is to love yourself, to empathize with others, and to live always, but always for your dreams and desires that you have buried in your memory data, part of the real brain.

Wolfpack Contributor Bio: Maid Corbic

Books to read for 2021: Things My Mother Left Behind by Susan Richardson (Potter’s Grove Press) with “Leaves” from the book

The first thing I noticed when reading Susan’s writing is the descriptive imagery, she makes you feel every emotion she feels.  This is a trait in writing that I admire and her telling of loss and depression at times returns me back on imagery I rarely see outside of Anne Sexton or Sylvia Plath.  The poetry reads like the story of her life through the love, loss, grief, the screaming pinches in the soul that losing a parent, child, or sibling staples-in forever.  She also hauntingly describes the progress of losing her sight as she has gone from a sky full of stars both sentient and still to the ones who blink out erratically til there is nothing left to burn.  These are not just some poems.  These are her life.  Emotions are hers.  When you read this collection of poetry the Emotions are yours too.  “Between Sight and Blindness” “Stitching Bones” the loves that got away “Cactus Garden” the pains that diseases bring, the people they take away, the hearts that feels like a car puttering out over the rainy bridge with nowhere to go, these poems will “scatter into the sky” scratching at the stars looking for the brightest one yet receiving in return a turning off the lights inside of Andy Warhol’s Silver Factory, in demure breath wanting the world see the pain. A wonderful read.  A wonderful trip into the mind. We need more of her poetic vision.

Susan Richardson is an award winning, internationally published poet. She is the author of “Things My Mother Left Behind”, from Potter’s Grove Press, and also writes the blog, “Stories from the Edge of Blindness

”. She lives in Ireland with her husband, two pugs and two cats.  You can find her on Twitter @floweringink, listen to her on YouTube , and read more of her work on her website

Leaves

Another hospital room,
another chair holding the weight of my sorrow.
His breath is almost soundless,
mouth open wide
as if inviting god into his lungs one last time.

His eyes flutter awake,
startled.

Is it my face he sees,
dulled by time,
or a face that once held the sun?

He smiles and strokes my fifty-year old hand,
all the years drifting away.
The blues sit perched on his dry lips.
I am his child,
four years old singing Lead Belly
at the top of my tiny lungs

I am a drop of his blood
spilling out onto the Earth,
a fracture of his bones
stuck into the ground with paper spikes.
I am the tear from his eye,
heavy, 
reluctant.

His hands are a whisper that tell a story,
a smattering of leaves on his palm,
fingers plucking at things only he can see,
my mother,
my brother,

both long dead.

I watch his chest barely rising,
each small breath
a forest of words trapped in the mist of his memory.
I wait for his stillness,
for the breaking pieces of his mind to be at rest.
He sits in my palm now,
softly,
frail like the wing of a sparrow.
He folds into shapes
so tiny
so quiet.

Poem by Susan Richardson : “Mean Girls”

A Book Review for Steve Denehan “The Streets, Like Flowers, Come Alive in the Rain” Review by Georgia Hilton

The Streets, Like Flowers, Come Alive in the Rain: Poetry Collection by [Steve Denehan]

https://amzn.to/3jWEMUq

The Streets, Like Flowers, Come Alive in The Rain,
(Steve Denehan, Potter’s Grove Press, 2021)

The first impression a reader may have when encountering Steve Denehan’s new collection is that the author has found his version of the good life and is unapologetically living it. There’s little poetic angst here – The Streets, Like Flowers, Come Alive in the Rain is quietly life-affirming and uplifting, but never corny or overly sentimental. Instead, it revels in the knowledge that joy arrives quietly, without fanfare, in small domestic moments. Take the poem ‘Rain’, where the author reflects that ‘happiness comes easy these days’, and that after searching for it for years, he realises ‘it was there all along/ hiding in plain sight/ in the folds of that old woollen blanket/ in the press filled with lunchboxes and Tupperware.’

That’s not to say that Denehan shies away from the difficult subjects, far from it. In The Tossed Coins of John Canning, the poet’s family meets a homeless man ‘a hard life behind him/a harder one to come’. Discovering that he is also a poet ‘of wrong turns/ and bad calls’, Denehan muses that ‘it could have been me/ could still be yet.’ This is someone who never takes his version of the good life for granted, who knows that everything can change in a heartbeat. Perhaps this is the key to the sense of quiet gratitude that permeates this collection.

Denehan is a humane, compassionate writer, but he also gives wry expression to some of the absurdities of modern life. In The High Cost of Breathing, Denehan recounts his disbelief at ‘The Oxygen Bar’, where he encounters a dozen people ‘smiling under oxygen masks/ breathing pure air/scented with flowers and butterscotch’. In Destination Restaurant, the poet can’t hide his revulsion at the ‘guffaw…of a truffle scoffing, oily-mouthed snob’. Denehan picks apart the absurdity and pretension of modern life with skilful precision, whilst reminding us of what’s really important – meaningful relationships with those we love.

It’s no surprise then that the most memorable poems are those written about Denehan’s daughter, Robin, who provides the foreword for the book. In One More Week, Robin writes a poem about her grandfather – ‘having read it/ I was quiet/ while I waited/ for the lump in my throat to subside’. In The Dance Class he muses that ‘inside her chest there are no corners/ her blood/ and some of mine/ dark fire dancing…with the only music that really matters.’

This is a collection primarily concerned with what really matters. It never sacrifices sincerity for artfulness but is nonetheless accomplished. As Robin herself says of her Dad’s writing – ‘his poems always make me think.’

Georgia Hilton

Wolfpack Contributor Bio: Georgia Hilton

The Featured Poetry Showcase for Steve Denehan