A Fevers of the Mind Quick-9 Interview with EIC of Fevers of the Mind David L O’Nan

davidlonan1 – Fevers of the Mind

with David L O’Nan (interviewing himself?)

Q1: When did you start writing and first influences?

David: I believe I began writing after having my older brother read his poetry to me. I would constantly read his stuff. He was always obsessed with song lyrics (Prince, U2, The Cure, The Smiths, The Beatles, etc) I really got into the Beatles around 12 years old, and began to write bad love songs & songs against war that were pretty cheesy. I’ve always had a storytelling imagination. I began reading Anne Sexton as a teenager and always have been a big song lyric absorber. With A.D.D. I wasn’t always the most patient with reading.

Q2: Who are your biggest influences today? Well once I started writing & reading aloud more at coffeehouses, I began learning & reading more poetry & writers. Burroughs, Kerouac, Sylvia Plath, Tom Waits, Townes Van Zandt, Phil Ochs, Bob Dylan, my favorite Leonard Cohen, Ilya Kaminsky, so many contemporaries I interact with in the Poetry & Writing Community.

Q3: Any pivotal moment when you knew you wanted to be a writer?

David: I still want to be a writer/poet. I am still learning at 41 years old the ins and outs. I guess I had that inkling around 12, then again at 20 writing angsty stuff (mad about women letting me down) and then 24/25 when I began frequenting a coffeehouse in Evansville. I began writing a scrapped up novel “The Bible Belt Bachelor” in the same vain as “On the Road” I had a break in writing through most of my 30s and then when my dad got sick with ALS I began writing more & more. Self published some stuff & began Fevers of the Mind.

Q4: Who has helped you most with writing?

David: My brother, my wife, the Penny Lane Coffeehouse, Reading aloud for several years (not so much anymore), Jean Kizer, Jerry Masterson, Heidi Krause, Twitter vss 365 getting me motivated again, Poetry Community, Leonard Cohen

Q5: Where did you grow up and how did that influence your writing & did any travels away from home influence your work?

David: I grew up in a small town in Kentucky called Sebree.

So, I do have many poems based on small town living in a Southern/Midwestern town. I carry over some personality (ies) from the town and interact them into new characters and situations at times. I have lived in Evansville, Indiana most of my adult life & now in Henderson, KY and I still write the same way. Perspectives from where i’m writing from doesn’t necessarily come from where i’m living. I have visited & lived for a short time in New Orleans, so much of my big city themed poetry comes from time living there, or visiting Nashville, Louisville, Lexington, St. Louis, Indianapolis, Bloomington and other Midwestern cities/towns.

Q6: What do you consider your most meaningful work you’ve done creatively so far to you?

David: This will be a slightly weird answer. I helped contribute poems to an anthology about ALS “Voices for the Cure” ran by Paul Rowe and the late Eric Valor. I am unsure if it ever came out, but the poems I placed in there are about my father and his battle with ALS. Some of these poems have seen the light of day in my self published work or also on this site. 2 poems by David L O’Nan about my father’s battle with ALS in 2016

I’m also proud of my poems that I’ve since revised for the upcoming Leonard Cohen anthology which the first versions of the poems were in the first Leonard Cohen Anthology “Avalanches in Poetry Writings & Art Inspired by Leonard Cohen) All of the poems (revised) from Avalanches in Poetry Writings & Art Inspired by Leonard Cohen by David L O’Nan

I’m also proud of my most recent poems that have been published online. “By the Almond Tree” in Anti-Heroin Chic Mag Check out my poem “By the Almond Tree” currently in the new issue of Anti-Heroin Chic (heroinchic.weebly.com)

My beat poem “Clearly” I wrote in 2005ish after reading Ginsberg for a couple of minutes Poem by David L O’Nan : “Clearly!” (2005) (Poetry, writings)

And my story poem “I Honoured You in Pennyrile Forest” a Best of the Net Nominee last year from Icefloe Press

https://icefloepress.net/2020/03/03/five-poems-by-david-o-nan/

I’m very proud of the community I’ve helped shape together with many writers for this site with active contributors, interviews, the Fevers of the Mind Poetry Digest Issues/Anthologies.

Q7: Favorite activities to relax?

David: General Anxiety/ADD/OCD/parenthood…relax? I try to read some, I watch wrestling, basketball, listen to music like crazy, taking walks with my wife, play in the park with my kids. Youtube wormholes, research/history.

Q8: What is a favorite line/stanza from a poem of yours or others?

David: From Leonard Cohen’s “Stories From the Street”

We are so small between the stars
So large against the sky
And lost among the subway crowds

I try to catch your eye

Q9: Any recent or forthcoming projects that you’d like to promote?

David: Why Sure! Thanks for asking…ummm Fevers of the Mind Anthology Issue 5: Overcome will be coming out soon (currently editing) I have 6 self-published books that i’m revising (added pics to the poems, changing them up some, some revised poems) “The Famous Poetry Outlaws are Painting Walls and Whispers” “Our Fears in Tunnels” “Taking Pictures in the Dark” “New Disease Streets” “The Cartoon Diaries” “Lost Reflections” still on Amazon currently…will be replaced by new versions when announced. Stay tuned. Raw forms of these books are still out there for now. There are several past issues of Fevers of the Mind Poetry Digest: Issue 1 (June 2019) under Fevers of the Mind Poetry & Art Digest, Fevers of the Mind Issue 2 In Memoriam, Fevers of the Mind Issue 3: The Darkness & the Light, Fevers of the Mind Press Presents the Poets of 2020, the aforementioned Leonard Cohen inspired Avalanches in Poetry Writings & Art Inspired by Leonard Cohen with artwork from Geoffrey Wren Wonderful Artwork from Avalanches in Poetry Writings & Art Inspired by Leonard Cohen by artist/writer Geoffrey Wren

The 2nd Leonard Cohen Anthology will be worked on in the next month “Before I Turn Into Gold” and also Fevers of the Mind Anthologies will be coming out at least every other month as far as I can keep it going.

Personally, I have more poems/stories coming out soon with Icefloe Press. A project on facebook “Curved Air” edited by Theresa Haffner. Possibly something with the Midwest Writers Guild. I’ve recently had work in Anti-Heroin Chic, Punk Noir Magazine. In the past I’ve had stuff in 3 Moon, Nymphs Publishing, Royal Rose Magazine, Elephants Never, Headline Poetry & Press, Dark Marrow, Voices for the Cure ALS Anthology, Spillwords, Ghost City Press, a feature in Cajun Mutt Press, I’ve had some stuff of mine read by Damien Donnelly on his podcast “Eat the Storms” https://eatthestorms.com/ and will have more read by Damien in a couple of weeks. Stay tuned!

I don’t send too much out due to RSD and I put tons of time in editing, writing, my brain scrambling in and out of exhaustion. Follow us on twitter @feversof @davidLONan1 Facebook Author Page is DavidLONan1 (I don’t use it much) I don’t have Instagram…sorry.

Here are some links:

There are a million I think on this site… just search my name if interested in my poems.

https://headlinepoetryandpress.com/author/feversofthemindfa86cd6e60/

https://punknoirmagazine.com/2021/07/05/4-poems-by-david-l-onan/

https://thepoetryquestion.com/2020/02/05/tpq5-david-l-onan/

https://nymphspublications.com/new-blog/miracle-white-by-david-l-onan

https://www.blackboughpoetry.com/freedom-rapture-edition (a review by me about this within)

https://cajunmuttpress.wordpress.com/2021/07/24/c-m-p-saturday-special-feature/

https://amzn.to/3Alh74S

https://amzn.to/3xC1Hr8

https://amzn.to/3jEUGAR

https://amzn.to/3lMJeWM

https://amzn.to/3lIMJxm

https://eatthestorms.com/2020/11/07/eat-the-storms-the-podcast-episode-10/

https://www.facebook.com/davidlonan1/

https://www.goodreads.com/author/show/18366060.David_L_O_Nan

https://ghostcitypress.com/poetry-60/2019/8/2/david-l-onan

https://nymphspublications.com/new-blog/wild-hearts-by-david-l-onan

http://heroinchic.weebly.com/blog/poetry-by-david-l-onan

https://icefloepress.net/six-poems-from-new-disease-streets-by-david-l-onan-w-a-digital-collage-by-robert-frede-kenter/

https://royalrosemagazine.com/2019/10/30/issue-four-unrequited-love/

A Book Review for Stuart Buck “Blue the Green Sky” review by Matthew da Silva

There are places people go to when they use their minds, places like poems that furnish them with the material they need to escape the bounds of mortality. Stuart M. Buck’s poems are either long or short in this collection, they use humour of an incisive brand to pare away the scales that lie over your eyes and once they have been removed you can perhaps see the poet laughing beside you like a statue of Bhudda you can think about buying online when the mood takes you to browse.

A Welshman, Buck gives you something to think about, something that will not only break the tedium of web surfing, but that provides open windows through which to view a world of contradictions. The role of sex, for example, is paradoxical. In ‘dear richard’ the narrator talks to a neighbour or a friend – someone he knows well enough to look after his house while he’s out of town – and tells him caustically that he’s “fucking your wife” but in ‘midnight in prague’ a different narrator imagines, as he’s walking around the eastern European city, that a woman is following him (“her scent a whisper, her taste. her taste. I burn for it.”) But then he thinks about infinity, as if the thought of the possibility of a strange woman following him around a strange city makes his imagination take flight and soar.

Humour works to temper such transcendent impulses, as happens in ‘rejection letter to the crow that just flew into my bedroom window’ which needs little to accompany it as the main gist of the poem is cemented in the title. Yet even while commiserating with a bird that came to an unpleasant end, the narrator celebrates the creature’s “innocence” and recognises “the delirium of flight” as something that he wants and, perhaps, dreams of. Is this the same thing the poet uses to anchor the unreality of sex and desire? In the longer poem his avatar muses, “i feel sad. these buildings deserve more than to be fucked, impregnated by moneymakers and endless tourist traps.” He wants more.

The problem of physicality the poem about the crow also contains is not resolved here but in other places the poet gains altitude and seems to leave the earth – or is this an illusion? In ‘tom waits and an infinite softness’ a trope the poet sometimes uses – global warming – arises at the outset but it’s immediately subsumed in the minute progress of imagination’s random ephemera that graze the consciousness of the narrator as she daydreams – it might be a bad trip she’s experiencing – but then, “suddenly i knew things i never knew before and i was in love and i had lost and i was in every moment of every life”. The dry evidence of a shared life on a lonely planet – the awareness of impending disaster – mutates without any interruption into contemplation of the divine.

This is the measure of this poet’s achievement. It’s there in the Prague meditation as well, in the way, at the end of that poem, he is tangling with things that cannot have a voice because they are too fragile even for words, things as hard to even think of, like infinity, which sits smiling beyond imagination. But still the poet tries to express what it looks, feels, and tastes like. “to feel infinity is, i believe, to place your thumbs over the eyes of a ghost. to feel the soft, giving eyeballs below. to have the power to end the sight of another, but instead to feel the flitting, papery wings of their dreams.”

At the other end of this spectrum is a hard-nosed and blank humour, almost humourlessness, as in ‘cat’ (which opens the collection): “on my way to kill myself i met / a very friendly cat” and as the narrator turns, deviating his progress along the street – the cat is probably one of those sociable felines that sits on walls in the sun waiting for passersby to stop and stroke them – he thinks about the universe. As you would if you were, for some outrageous instant, thinking of putting an end to your life. And what does the man think? He thinks, “we are all decomposing slowly / so that is of some comfort”. This is dead, stone cold but then you get the feeling that this flash of awareness has helped the narrator to get through another tortured moment. Perhaps there is a God and on this day the eternal deity just happened to take the form of a roadside moggy?

An interview with Stu Buck of Bear Creek Gazette

A Book Review of Alan Parry “Neon Ghosts” A Review by Matthew da Silva

Many of the poems in this collection are very short and are designed to capture a single lived moment where memory and experience merge in the flux of consciousness. When I was reading I was trying to place the poet geographically – was he British? American? (he’s British) – and so had to search for his name online but the universality of these observations of life is what strikes the reader, the poet’s ability to reach inside you as you scan each short line, picking up the referents and passing them to the mental synapses in your brain.

If there’s a narrative set up within this fragmentary world it’s one of the night in a foreign place, such as we find in the eponymous poem (‘Neon Ghosts’) in which, it appears, a man and a woman are getting ready to go out for dinner. The man is in the living room going about his business and the woman is in the shower getting ready. The man occasionally stares vacantly at the TV, which is on, and catches brief sequences of segments aired for viewers throughout the city. A politician is caught up in a scandal. The politician is a neon ghost but what about the man and the woman? Are they, also, something like ghosts? It seems, as a reader, that they might be indeed – and then what about me who’s writing this review about a book which contains a poem with, embedded in it, like a flash of lightning, three particular, vivid neon ghosts? What’s real and what’s just a stray phenomenon like a thought?

Where is the boundary between fiction and reality? The ephemeral nature of existence is catalogued in this relatively long poem. In ‘The Scene’, which is much shorter, an almost fictional America is imagined by the poet, a place “Stuart Davis knew” with “skyscrapers in / technicolour” full of “gas pumps” and “rooftops” that is “in full swing”. As in the first poem I talk about, here Parry economically reaches into the reader’s subconscious and drags out images that “belong” to a particular place at a specific point in time. Stuart Davis, a painter inspired by jazz, is a signal referent that pulls you back to the middle of the last century, a time when America’s place in the world was still being negotiated.

Perhaps it was a more innocent time because it came before all of the struggles of the second half of that century, but because of the link to now-still-popular artforms, it was perhaps a time when the soul of the nation was nevertheless cemented in the global imagination. Or else it’s because of the struggles of the second half of the century that the achievements of an earlier age finally came to be celebrated. What’s important is that the ideas the poet places in words are also inside the reader. A brief, mediated connection is made that links minds. All of the special resonances evoked by the name “America” suddenly rise up like ghosts to inhabit the room where the reader sits, focused on the grey page.

The dark energies of humanity are also canvassed, for example in ‘God’ and ’15:30’ – poems that appear conveniently on facing pages. A theme opened in ‘Neon Gods’ takes flight in ’15:30’ where “young daughters in / green pencil skirts & / high socks / hold their knees close” while boys stand watching them on the opposite corner. The shopkeeper is like a guardian in this dynamic scene that is fresh as a bird’s wing and just as swift, being over almost before it’s begun. In ‘God’, the man who’s focalising the narrative is “watching women walk under speechless green trees” and because of where this poem sits in the collection – right opposite the one already mentioned – you’re left wondering what is given to the reader to contemplate without speech.

The underbelly of society is exposed and the position of America – almost as if the name had been tattooed on life – is a refrain the poet keeps returning to like a memory of a tune heard in a commercial that aired in a hotel room while he was waiting to go out for dinner with his girlfriend. Though he thinks about getting into the shower he knows that there’s no time for monkey business – they have a reservation – and so he contents himself with daydreaming. In his mind old jazz tunes mix with the neon ghosts that are his brothers and sisters.

A Fevers of the Mind Quick-9 Interview with Alan Parry

Poetry/Sonnet by Matthew da Silva : On my Way to New England

Book Review for Jeff Parent ‘This Bygone Route’ review by Maid Corbic

https://www.thetemzreview.com/store/p18/This_Bygone_Route_by_Jeff_Parent.html

to purchase book or learn more click link above

Jeff Parent @yuppoems on Twitter

“This Bygone Route” is one wonderful book collection that continues to conquer the entire world. In each poem we can find knowledge of the world and of what we may present ourselves today; his words are still very large and steady no matter what else they say. Struggling with himself and his ego, he continues to revive his deeds in beautiful deeds that are instructive to all of us, not just him. Many of these poems that I have read are very important, so they talk about life, the real state of man and emotions that are trivial, equally persistent, and they can always tell us about life that is equal. Of course, everything we experience is just one real situation that we have to overcome with courage and equality, and this collection of books shows us just that.

A special stylistic text describes all the poems I have read and are metrically very accurate. It is very difficult to see that today. This collection is also very wonderful as it also has many lyrical images; describes nature, a man who always tries to fight what is still stable and flat for him, with human epithets and times that are bad for him. His stage of life as well as his thinking itself gradually changes when he realizes that he can no longer hold on to equality and words that continued to become harder and harder for him. A collection that always gives selectness, is always concisely worded every one of his works that carries multiple messages; the struggle for rights, unrequited love or those conditions that we have to worry about, mentally where many today no longer care about it and create dangerous barriers. Every goal must also justify the means, because only in this way can we declare a story to be realistic and enduring. Not otherwise.


The struggle is present and the passion for a man to wake up from some daydreams like a phoenix and to rise far regardless of the events around him. The name of the collection itself can carry a lot of forty-one poems, each of which is fantastic in its own way, and each of them shows an explicit desire and opportunity to progress in this world that has continued to become unsettled. Times change and life slowly begins to get harder and harder, but the author does not give up so easily either; he reciprocates his energies in each poem and proves that the world around him is still dignified and colorful, and that in the end he has reason to live another year in happiness and peace, and not just be one sad black bird that has to fly from one end. on the other. He still carried sin in some poems, but that does not mean that he is a sinner. On the contrary, he is a very strong man who shows time and direction in every poem, a direction he deserves to proudly carry in the depths of his woven soul, because he values around himself the best deeds and works that other people bring him.

Of all the poems, “Eclipse Year” is the most realistic because it is about the author himself who is trying to find his peace in his world and to live some of his unfulfilled dreams, because he wanted to be still alive; only he felt he was trapped between two lines and no longer had a reason to live some of his cherished dreams. But on the contrary, he believed, as in many poems, that God is only one and that everything he creates is really just his thought that made him think of others maybe some bad things and maybe he did not dream or want that. He believed that there must be a story behind every corner that would lead him to some small details that would eventually lead to even bigger ones, but he thought that time did best. This is what the narrative of the poem itself says, the year of the turning point and the environment in which he finds himself, and it is time to finally dedicate himself and realize all his dreams until he finally becomes an old man and where he will still not be able to work and dream all his dreams. the desires he dreamed; because his reality was still on shaky ground. The year of cataclysm, to put it mildly, this poems says that we still have to be strong and look forward as always, not to think black things because that’s the only way those that we don’t want to see and feel can happen to us, because the worst defeat is when we declare without any warning beforehand. Year after year, some things will improve. Nothing will ever stay so dark and that justice must always win in the end.

“Coming home” means one part of the song in which the author sets himself in plans and wishes, but he slowly realizes it. He lives in an ideal world where nothing is equal to him, but he is afraid of being so doomed in that reality, because he must value himself first and foremost and ultimately be the leader of his dreams that he realizes. He wanted everything he did to be only in his mind and that one day if he was lucky and accomplished. This poem is thoughtful, but of course it takes on great significance because the lack of the figure of an important person still leaves a trace of the great in the heart that cannot be healed so easily, as for example his father when he loved very much and I would give anything for him. Nothing happened just so by accident and he had to believe that between waking and dreaming there is only one wish and thought, and that is a better and more beautiful world that awaits him one day when he disappears. The belief is that the world is one steam engine that leads to the end and that revision is always just his life, which no longer makes sense because of a very important figure. Some things cannot be repeated together as before.


“Humidex” is also a great poem that says that the title is first and foremost very special and that it fits in brilliantly about these happenings, is the self-awareness it holds. Psychologically speaking, metrically correct. Many competitions can achieve exceptional work, but of course its message is numerous, which the author must eventually find a solution on his own and be guided by thoughts that have become very difficult for him, because the song itself requires a lot of concentration. But far from true, of course this is a poem that has emotions and style in it, it has colors and comparisons even.

I was especially impressed by the fact that it is very nicely decorated in a visual sense; from margins to padding, to numbering, and from poems to lyrical images to metaphors – in one place everything can be found very easily and in an assistant. All the titles of the poems are very ingenious and creative, each author can find inspiration for some future works that he will have and that in the end he creates something that no one else could, and that is diversity.

With forty-one pages, forty-one possible visions of the world, I still have a strong impression after reading, so it is true that this book may be extremely incomprehensible for beginners, but for professionals it is very clear and helpful.


“Acid Rain Day” is a poem that is presented in the most beautiful light. It is one of the long poems that are free forms, as well as many poems that you will read here of course with great joy, it is wonderful when that love is still cultivated sincere and pure, which is drinkable according to the times to come, nature and culture of living on which we observe “for granted”. Much is offered here, from family values to encouragement in every desire, for yet the courage today is that anything can be done, and be warted to ruin. It all makes you laugh when you are a parent who puts herself in her roots and supports the virgin, not to cry and be happy when she lives her true dream that must come true anyway. It is the poem that talks about parenthood, courage and the very culture of living, the epilogue of the event is all the memories of the window that are watched in silence.

It is important to say that everything is very nicely packaged, from the composition of the parents to the black bird that flies silently in songs, sometimes a happy epilogue and sometimes sad give a psychological meaning to a person to develop his writing and focus on a reality that never she was no closer. After reading this you can be very proud of yourself, because it is wonderful at the end of each work to realize that there are some emotions that you also live, that we all live. That is why the poems serve us, as well as Acid Rain Day to show that there is joy between every sorrow, even though it is the window of the observer’s eye, it depends on the time we live in, so it will be for us. And I, I tell you to read this book and to happily share your advice with everyone around you, because only in this way can some things be experienced and be as wonderful and fabulous as ever. In the end, the message of this book is to love yourself, to empathize with others, and to live always, but always for your dreams and desires that you have buried in your memory data, part of the real brain.

Book Review by Maid Corbic: 2 poems by Maid Corbic : Counterculturality & Decriptivity II

A Book Review for Steve Denehan “The Streets, Like Flowers, Come Alive in the Rain” Review by Georgia Hilton

The Streets, Like Flowers, Come Alive in the Rain: Poetry Collection by [Steve Denehan]

https://amzn.to/3jWEMUq

The Streets, Like Flowers, Come Alive in The Rain,
(Steve Denehan, Potter’s Grove Press, 2021)

The first impression a reader may have when encountering Steve Denehan’s new collection is that the author has found his version of the good life and is unapologetically living it. There’s little poetic angst here – The Streets, Like Flowers, Come Alive in the Rain is quietly life-affirming and uplifting, but never corny or overly sentimental. Instead, it revels in the knowledge that joy arrives quietly, without fanfare, in small domestic moments. Take the poem ‘Rain’, where the author reflects that ‘happiness comes easy these days’, and that after searching for it for years, he realises ‘it was there all along/ hiding in plain sight/ in the folds of that old woollen blanket/ in the press filled with lunchboxes and Tupperware.’

That’s not to say that Denehan shies away from the difficult subjects, far from it. In The Tossed Coins of John Canning, the poet’s family meets a homeless man ‘a hard life behind him/a harder one to come’. Discovering that he is also a poet ‘of wrong turns/ and bad calls’, Denehan muses that ‘it could have been me/ could still be yet.’ This is someone who never takes his version of the good life for granted, who knows that everything can change in a heartbeat. Perhaps this is the key to the sense of quiet gratitude that permeates this collection.

Denehan is a humane, compassionate writer, but he also gives wry expression to some of the absurdities of modern life. In The High Cost of Breathing, Denehan recounts his disbelief at ‘The Oxygen Bar’, where he encounters a dozen people ‘smiling under oxygen masks/ breathing pure air/scented with flowers and butterscotch’. In Destination Restaurant, the poet can’t hide his revulsion at the ‘guffaw…of a truffle scoffing, oily-mouthed snob’. Denehan picks apart the absurdity and pretension of modern life with skilful precision, whilst reminding us of what’s really important – meaningful relationships with those we love.

It’s no surprise then that the most memorable poems are those written about Denehan’s daughter, Robin, who provides the foreword for the book. In One More Week, Robin writes a poem about her grandfather – ‘having read it/ I was quiet/ while I waited/ for the lump in my throat to subside’. In The Dance Class he muses that ‘inside her chest there are no corners/ her blood/ and some of mine/ dark fire dancing…with the only music that really matters.’

This is a collection primarily concerned with what really matters. It never sacrifices sincerity for artfulness but is nonetheless accomplished. As Robin herself says of her Dad’s writing – ‘his poems always make me think.’

Georgia Hilton

The Featured Poetry Showcase for Steve Denehan

Reviewer bio: Georgia Hilton is an Irish poet and fiction writer living in Winchester, England. Her poem Dark-Haired Hilda Replies to Patrick Kavanagh won the Brian Dempsey Memorial Prize in 2018, and she has a pamphlet I went up the lane quite cheerful and a collection Swing, both published by Dempsey and Windle. Her short fiction has appeared in Lunate Fiction, Fictive Dream and the Didcot Writers anthology. Georgia tweets sometimes at @GGeorgiahilton

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